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Plant identification  RSS feed

 
Posts: 2
Location: Franktown, Colorado, USA
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Hi,
I've been exploring plant identification with a focus on native species.  Now that I'm starting to see flowering plants coming up on my property I'm trying to identify some of them.  I'm in Eastern Douglas County, Colorado.  I think I'm starting with a pretty hard one, but not much else is in bloom yet ... so here goes.  Pictures attached.

Given the compound umbel I'm thinking it's in the parsley family, which could make it really toxic.  Valerian also seemed like a possibility.  I see five white petals with some purple, no easily identifiable sepals, no visible pistils, and what appears to be between 1 and 3 purple stamens.  The leaves appear to be in a basal and opposite configuration.  The stem and leaves both appear fuzzy, and the stem is purpleish. 

I don't have any intention of eating this plant, being so inexperienced at this ... but it does grow in my dog run, so that concerns me a bit.  Anyone have any ideas?

Thanks!
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Whole plant, focused on leaves.
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Side of compound umbel flowers.
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Close up on flowers.
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Another look at the leaves.
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Bottom side of leaves, spread out.
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With root structure.
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Close up on flowers with part of the cluster removed.
 
Posts: 16
Location: South Shore, Massachusetts, USA (Zone 6b)
chicken food preservation homestead
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Hi Jason,

I agree with you about the compound umbel and it being in the parsley family. After spending about 20 minutes looking at various photos online, I'm stumped. Nothing I can find seems to fit the bill. The purple stamens are what throw me off.

Now I want to know the answer too! Hopefully someone with more experience that me will chime in!
 
Christopher Nickelson-Mann
Posts: 16
Location: South Shore, Massachusetts, USA (Zone 6b)
chicken food preservation homestead
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I couldn't give up!

Is this it!? http://www.americansouthwest.net/plants/wildflowers/orogenia-linearifolia.html

 
Jason Woodrich
Posts: 2
Location: Franktown, Colorado, USA
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Is this it!? http://www.americansouthwest.net/plants/wildflowers/orogenia-linearifolia.html



The flowers look really similar, but the leaves in the pictures look pretty different.  I like that website though, thanks for the link.  That lead me to this one: http://www.americansouthwest.net/plants/wildflowers/lomatium-nevadense.html

The leaves are still a little different.  I looked in a list of plants found in Colorado to see if Lomatium Nevadense is there and didn't see it, but found Lomatium Orientale (Northern Idaho Biscuitroot).  This looks a lot like it:
http://navigate.botanicgardens.org/weboi/oecgi2.exe/INET_ECM_DispPl?NAMENUM=29575
http://www.easterncoloradowildflowers.com/Lomatium_orientale.htm
https://www.minnesotawildflowers.info/flower/northern-idaho-biscuitroot

Seems like a pretty good match to me, but I'm still pretty new at this.
 
Christopher Nickelson-Mann
Posts: 16
Location: South Shore, Massachusetts, USA (Zone 6b)
chicken food preservation homestead
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That looks like a perfect match! Good work!

http://www.easterncoloradowildflowers.com/Lomatium_orientale.htm
 
gardener
Posts: 824
Location: Olympia, WA - Zone 8a/b
292
bike books forest garden fungi homestead hugelkultur kids trees
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Got a plant for you all to try to identify. One of my colleagues found this at a site we monitor. It is a shrub and seemed to be spreading. I'm afraid I don't have too much info about since I was not at the site.
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Posts: 46
Location: Oklahoma - Zone 6b today 7a tomorrow
5
chicken food preservation forest garden
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Daphne mezereum
 
Daron Williams
gardener
Posts: 824
Location: Olympia, WA - Zone 8a/b
292
bike books forest garden fungi homestead hugelkultur kids trees
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Thanks!
 
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