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Seedling Avocados

 
pollinator
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Location: New Zealand
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I hear a lot of people talk about how bad seedling avocados are. It is true that they are less reliable than grafted cultivars and can take a while to produce fruit, but are they really that bad? My experience is that I am yet to taste a bad seedling, and only one seedling tree I know of has not produced any fruit. This one tree flowers in mid winter, so is not pollinated.

Here's a handful of seedling avocados from one of my trees, with a tennis ball for size comparison. Tastes great too.


 
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When I lived in Africa, every avocado was grown from seed.  There wasn't any consistency in what you would find in the market, so it was a matter of quantity, not quality.  Yes, you can grow from seed, and yes, there will be a fair number of them that will actually be fruitful.  But will you get decent fruit that you'll want to eat?  Further, you could wait 5 years and still not get anything.  It's a crap shoot.

If you have land and lots of time and space, then it seems like a great experiment.  But if you're limited for land and time, it makes a whole lot more sense to buy a grafted tree from a tried and true cultivar.
 
Ben Waimata
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Marco Banks wrote:When I lived in Africa, every avocado was grown from seed.  There wasn't any consistency in what you would find in the market, so it was a matter of quantity, not quality.  Yes, you can grow from seed, and yes, there will be a fair number of them that will actually be fruitful.  But will you get decent fruit that you'll want to eat?  Further, you could wait 5 years and still not get anything.  It's a crap shoot.

If you have land and lots of time and space, then it seems like a great experiment.  But if you're limited for land and time, it makes a whole lot more sense to buy a grafted tree from a tried and true cultivar.



Biodiversity is always good....! But yes agreed, if you have room for only one avocado, plant a grafted specimen!
 
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There's nothing saying you can't grow out the most vigorous and healthy plants from pits as rootstock and graft from desirable sources onto those with the least desireable fruit.

-CK
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