Larz Giles

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since Jan 17, 2012
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Recent posts by Larz Giles

I have seen groundnuts grow in places where the ground was not that wet ..
3 years ago

Thanks alot, that's very interesting
3 years ago
Do you have a return address, supplier name or anything on that ? ground nut seeds are a very unusual find. Ken over at Oikos runs a nursery business and he has never been able to find a seed supplier.

Most all places sell tubers rather than seeds
3 years ago

I did not see seeds on ebay .. Perhaps you ordered tubers ?

There's other plants in Africa called groundnut as well as peanut which is sometimes refereed to as groundnut, you ordered from ebay where it said "Apios Americana" ?
3 years ago
Did you buy ground nut seeds or tubers ?

finding seeds is not easy and many plants do not produce seeds. If you have a seed source, I would be interested in knowing where I can get some. There was a seed supplier in Burgaw NC quite a few years ago but the last time I talked to him, he said he no longer can get seeds as that land was sold.

I actually found a seed source in the wild, but it seems fairly unusual in my experience .. I did sprout some from seeds and I sent some of the seeds to a nursery in Ohio

Once you get a plant or two growing, then go looking for them in the wild as you will know what they look like
3 years ago
Hi, yes it can do well with quite alot of shade .. The tubers are the main edible part .. Sometimes pea pods form but not always ..
3 years ago



https://www.meetup.com/Boston-Permaculture/boards/view/viewthread?thread=50498263

"Dr. Iago Hale, Assistance Professor of Speciality Crop Improvement at UNH, has issued a CALL TO ACTION in response to a proposal from the Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resource to place hardy kiwi on the restricted/prohibited plant list for the state. Comments must be made in person at the hearing on January 10 or emailed by 5 PM on the 10th. See his letter for further details."

==================


https://paradiselotblog.wordpress.com/2017/01/05/call-to-action-hardy-kiwi-may-be-illegal-to-grow-in-new-england/


The Massachusetts Invasive Plant Advisory Group (MIPAG) has voted to designate a locally-produced species of kiwifruit (Actinidia arguta; a.k.a. the kiwiberry) as “likely invasive” in the state and has petitioned to have it added to the Mass. Department of Agricultural Resources (MADR) statewide prohibited plant list – on questionable grounds, according to Dr. Iago Hale, assistant professor of specialty crop improvement at the University of New Hampshire. Such an unprecedented listing of a commercialized fruit crop will, says Hale, prohibit Massachusetts farmers from growing kiwiberries, a low-input perennial specialty crop with a profit value exceeding $20,000/acre; and will deny Massachusetts residents the ability to buy kiwiberries from their grocery stores and farmers’ markets, even if the berries are produced out of state. Much of the evidence provided by MIPAG in this case is anecdotal or speculative, says Hale, adding that in many instances the claims are false.


If hardy kiwi is banned in Massachusetts there is a reasonable probability that all New England States will also restrict the cultivation and sale of this fruit.


As of 2017 Stephen Breyer at Tripple Brook Farm has a 30 year old kiwi vine that is at the top of a 100 year old maple tree. A wild concord grape is smothering the kiwi vine and killing it. Grape vines are sooooo invasive😉

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http://extension.psu.edu/plants/tree-fruit/news/2013/hardy-kiwifruit-invasive-plant-or-throwback-to-the-gilded-age

In 2012, the Massachusetts Audubon Society published an Invasive Plant Pest Alert on hardy kiwifruit, Actinidia arguta, also called "tara vine", strongly urging people not to grow or propagate this plant. The apparently rampant growth of vines had been documented at three particular locations. These sites stand in marked contrast to observations of the behavior of commercial and research plantings in PA, OR, MN, NY, ME and many other locations, where planted specimens have stayed in place and seedlings have extremely rarely germinated from fallen berries.

===============

http://www.unh.edu/halelab/kiwiberry/MIPAG_Call_to_Action_Jan1.pdf

before the January 10 deadline
(5 PM) for written public
comments, please email Taryn LaScola
(Taryn.LaScola@state.ma.us)
and request that MDAR not include
the kiwiberry on its list of prohibited plants:
3 years ago

I started growing groundnuts last year on my land in Maine. I originally ordered tubers from sand mountain herbs in Alabama. Some of these I sprouted indoors on a window sill in early spring no problem without grow lights. I also ordered groundnut seeds (seeds not tubers) from a supplier in Burgaw NC. The plants from seeds are not at all as vigorous the first year and tend to be weak growths.

After I had a few groundnuts popping up and realizing what they looked like, I managed to find some growing in the wild. This was not easy, but I was apparently lucky. They don't grow just anywhere. Many of these I transplanted onto my land. They seem to transplant fine until they get too big which starts to happen around July I would say. When they are bigger, transplanting them seems to cause the vine to die back to nothing and whether the tuber is still alive is hard to tell, though I have seen a few come back. I would say they definitely need moist soil. If it is too dry, they will likely die off unless you water them constantly. They can grow pretty well in partial shade or sun as long as it's not too dry. They seem to like sandy or peat like soil that is maybe a little loose, but I have seen them grow in kind of clay like soil a bit. I don't think they will grow in swampy wet soil, but it seems like they can survive occasional flooding.

The place where I have found the most groundnuts seems to be on sandy banks of rivers. In fact I have found them growing like crazy in some places like that. Here in New England, I curiously seem to come across them on the side of an old farm road from time to time. A newer road that has been disturbed with newer construction and alot of invasive species seems to not usually have any. I never can tell where I will come across them, they are not super common, but I always am on the lookout for them.
8 years ago