Adrien Lapointe

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Adrien grew up in Northern Quebec where he was exposed to gardening, hunting, fishing, and small fruit gathering. He was also exposed to large scale farming as his parents owned a farm for some years growing barley, canola and at one point raising milk sheep. Growing up he always had rabbits, chickens and various other small livestock.

Now an avid gardener, foodie, amateur woodworker, and raw milk advocate, he is experimenting with hugelkultur and polyculture, cooking from scratch, experimenting on reducing his ecological footprint, and much more.

Adrien was introduced to Permaculture few years ago through Joel Salatin’s techniques and travelled down the rabbit hole to end up at Permies.
Kingston, Canada (USDA zone 5a)
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Recent posts by Adrien Lapointe



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Summary

Credit: Josh Pasholk

In part two of two, Paul and Jocelyn continue to reflect on ‘The Food Cure’ Movie. The primary theme is how diet can affect the results of a cancer diagnosis.

Can food cure cancer?

Paul and Joselyn exchange anecdotes and discuss their take on the film and it’s issues.

Relevant Threads

389 - Review of the food cure - part 1
The Food Cure - a documentary about cancer
crowdfunding forum at permies
Dr. Charlotte Gerson lecture on Gerson Therapy

Support the Empire

Help support the empire and get all of the podcasts in a bundle here in the digital market at permies.

To support production of these podcasts, make a donation here at Paul's Patreon page.



This podcast was made possible thanks to:

Lisa Goodspeed
Keith Kuhnsman
thomas adams
Jocelyn Campbell
Julia Mason
Dominic Crolius
Josh Phillips
wade L
Suleiman ALAQEL
Ash Jackson is The Scrollbard
Jason Hower
Bill Crim
Full Name
Doug Barth
Miroslav Ultrama
James Tutor
David Ingraham


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Summary

Credit: Dawn Hoff

Paul and Jocelyn review the documentary "The Food Cure", which is about 6 people who try to heal cancer through food. The people portrayed in the movie is from all stages in life and from around the world with various different types of cancer. The majority of them try a predominantly vegan dietary therapy called the Gerson diet.

Relevant Threads

The Food Cure - a documentary about cancer
crowdfunding forum at permies
Dr. Charlotte Gerson lecture on Gerson Therapy

Support the Empire

Help support the empire and get all of the podcasts in a bundle here in the digital market at permies.

To support production of these podcasts, make a donation here at Paul's Patreon page.



This podcast was made possible thanks to:

Lisa Goodspeed
Keith Kuhnsman
thomas adams
Jocelyn Campbell
Julia Mason
Dominic Crolius
Josh Phillips
wade L
Suleiman ALAQEL
Ash Jackson is The Scrollbard
Jason Hower
Bill Crim
Full Name
Doug Barth
Miroslav Ultrama
James Tutor
David Ingraham


Listen Online
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Summary

Credit: Julia Winter and Craig Dobbson

This is the podcast for the  Permaculture Smackdown with Josiah Wallingford, Cliff, Michelle and Tuesday!    Cliff Ponder was in the boot program at Wheaton Labs.  Michelle was there as well, she wasn’t a boot but she did lots of things.  They were there for the 2017 PDC and ATC and there they met Josiah. They have a Kickstarter going on RIGHT NOW (ends February 22) and they asked for Paul’s advice, and they implemented it.

Josiah says one of the best things about a PDC is the people you meet, and Cliff and Michelle were some of the best things about the 2017 PDC for him. The Ponders showed up in March, there was still snow.  Cliff helped out with the broken well comedy.  They showed up to be gappers and then Paul offered that if Cliff put in some weeks as a boot, he could take the PDC.

Paul really wants this Kickstarter to succeed. These are 3 people who have donated much time and effort to Paul’s projects.This is not just a tour with documentation, the main project is producing these courses. Each person they visit is going to teach something you may want to know.  The courses will have interactivity - you will “meet” like minded people in the other folks taking the course along with you and be able to have your questions answered.  There will be live events where you can directly interact with the instructor and your classmates.

Paul notes he’s put a lot of his stuff into the Kickstarter pledge levels - please go and see what they are offering!

Relevant Threads

Josiah's thread
Josiah's Kickstarter
Another YT video about the Kickstarter
2018 PDC
2018 Peasant PDC
2018 ATC

Support the Empire

Help support the empire and get all of the podcasts in a bundle here in the digital market at permies.

To support production of these podcasts, make a donation here at Paul's Patreon page.



This podcast was made possible thanks to:

Lisa Goodspeed
Keith Kuhnsman
thomas adams
Jocelyn Campbell
Julia Mason
Dominic Crolius
Josh Phillips
wade L
Suleiman ALAQEL
Ash Jackson is The Scrollbard
Jason Hower
Bill Crim
Full Name
Doug Barth
Miroslav Ultrama
James Tutor
David Ingraham


Listen Online
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Get all of the podcasts in convenient, giant zip files
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Summary

Credit: Craig Dobbson

This is part two of the podcast where Paul and Jocelyn are speaking about their wish list for the property. The first thing they talk about is the chateau de Poo, which is a beautiful... outhouse. It took three months to build but looks very nice, with hand cut shingles and everything. There were some things that could be improved and while some of those things have been done, more still needs to be done. Being that this was the first Chateau they've built, it's not too shabby.

Next up is a little discussion on the cold smoker and spring house. First Paul talks about one key missing ingredient in this space is an actual spring. He then goes on to alk about a previous property that he owned which had many springs on it. Nine of them to be exact. Since then, paul has wished to create many projects using the various aspects of a spring, including combing one with a cold smoker.

The next thing on the list is an electric gate so that folks that come and go frequently, could open and close the gate with the press of a button, as opposed to getting out of the car twice to manage the task manually.

The last thing on the list is for Paul and Jocelyn to be living out on the lab. The original idea was to spend a few years living at base camp while they built up the lab. Part of this idea was that there would be four wofatis built and that there would be folks living in them. Oh so much comedy happened. Apparently there was a lot of effort involved in log peeling that wasn't foreseen, so getting those structures built took quite a lot longer than they had hoped. Jocelyn is surprised that many folks have been critical of her and Paul living at base camp while they lived on the lab. She points out that in order to pay for folks to live up at the lab, work must be done at base camp to cover the expenses. They spend a few minutes talking about how some of the structures need some work and that they need to get more folks working together to build community as well. Jocelyn mentions that she would like to have a fenced in community garden as well. This could be used to feed people at events that are hosted at the lab.

They take the next few minutes to talk about the PDC, Peasant PDC and the ATC. They also talk about past events and the potential for new experiences at the labs including super-weeks.

Paul then goes on the go through a list of fantasies he has for the base camp. These include, six or more people living full time at base camp. There is also talk about starting a tiny house village, but that is dependent on having a good road. That has been a little tricky but now it appears that they have a very nice road up to that space and soon the village can be built. They spend a couple of minutes talking about availability of acres of land at base camp. Paul then talks about his idea for the future of the lab and base camp, where he wishes for basecamp to be a permaculture demonstration site, while the lab remains a private place for residents to experiment away from folks who may not understand or approve of what they are doing.

The electric tractor is up and running but nobody really wants to drive it. Paul explains a little bit about what could be better about the tractor, including the fact that it needs to be weatherproofed and perhaps the batteries need to be reoriented.

Paul would like more portable cabins on the land because many people really like the love shack. Skiddable structures are a great benefit as would having year round residents to occupy them. During events, bunk space is limited so more places for people to sleep would be a big help.

The fisher price house needs to have some work done to make the outer spaces better align with the house layout. The garage was divided into two places, one side for parking and the other for a canning operation, with insulation and heating and AC. This section is now called the library. It has desks and a growing collection of books. The other section of the garage is going to be modified for getting extra lighting, rolley shelves, and gappers from time to time. The idea is to make it a functional and dynamic space, depending on the needs.

Paul would like to finish the berm shed which is almost done, but first it needs to have some repairs made to the protective layers. All of the twelve cells are full of stuff and Paul thinks they need another couple of berm sheds. Much of the soil for these projects will need to come from the lab. Along with that, they'd like more berms and hugelkultur beds for privacy and decor. Soon a living fence will be installed.

The rocket mass heater in the fisher price house needs one final piece but there is a little hang up in getting that done. This has also been the case with other projects like the siege ladders that are needed for the berms systems.

Of course they want to have tons of gardens all over, especially in their zone one spaces as well as at the caldera at the top of the volcano. Jocelyn talks a bit about the caldera which currently has a porch swing, but perhaps some day could have more fun stuff like a place for a fire and some storage.

More paddocks are needed all around volcano road so that it can serve as a lane way for animals to move from paddock to paddock in a rotational grazing system. Currently there is not a suitable fencing for protecting animals and there are real threats from wild animals like mountain lions.

They need about 20 ponds, interconnected with an ability to move water from the lowest pond to the highest one to keep the water on the land. Being that the land is mostly rock, this is going to be a serious challenge. Paul mentions that the pond system will eventually clean the water as it moves repeatedly through the series of water bodies.

Paul wants to do many things to modify the house so that they can get by on half as much wood as they currently use. This would include an insulated porch, more lighting, thick rugs, heavy winter curtains and heated dog beds to keep certain areas warm where people congregate.

They would like to do an overhaul of the pee-palace and the compost pile system that can be used to heat water via hoses that run through the pile. It needs a full design do-over and the materials in the piles need to be refined to get more heat out of it.

The solar leviathan and the voltswagon need some work as well. The inverters are currently not matched for the systems that they are working with.  

They also have a need for chickens, cats and dogs. This may be a good deterrent for the wild turkeys that currently cause trouble on the hugelcultures.

Paul gives a little overview about how a heliostat works and that the one that they had was wrought with issues that were partly fixed and how it eventually fell to the ground and smashed.

In an effort to make things more quiet, Paul would like more water features, growies and even a white noise system to help block out the noise of passing cars. Increasing the height of the berms would also be good. Modifications need to be made to

Lastly, Paul would like to build a submarine for world domination. Actually it would be a bunkhouse, but it would also be a submarine.

Relevant Threads

386 - Wheaton Labs Goals - part 1
Appropriate Technology Course
Wofati berm shed
Peasant PDC
Wheaton Labs
Hugelkultur
Permaculture bootcamp

Support the Empire

Help support the empire and get all of the podcasts in a bundle here in the digital market at permies.

To support production of these podcasts, make a donation here at Paul's Patreon page.



This podcast was made possible thanks to:

Lisa Goodspeed
Keith Kuhnsman
thomas adams
Jocelyn Campbell
Julia Mason
Dominic Crolius
Josh Phillips
wade L
Suleiman ALAQEL
Ash Jackson is The Scrollbard
Jason Hower
Bill Crim
Full Name
Doug Barth
Miroslav Ultrama
James Tutor
David Ingraham


Listen Online
Download

Get all of the podcasts in convenient, giant zip files
Subscribe on iTunes

Summary

Credit: Julia Winter

In this podcast, Paul and Jocelyn go over their long term goals and fantasies about what can happen at Wheaton Laboratories https://permies.com/f/102/labs (The Lab and Basecamp) over the next several years. Paul has made a list. Jocelyn would like to see new things being created, not just repairing and maintaining what’s already there. Paul wants to facilitate the presence of more people, and more professional people.

Paul and Jocelyn both work full time to try to support the projects, they’re definitely not getting rich here. Paul would love to have someone on site who could manage and rent out all of the various structures, but they have yet to find someone who could do this successfully. Paul can no longer be “the expert” for everything - he feels he gave that up when he bought the property.

Paul’s dream is to live in a community where everyone has their own expertise: one person is an expert with bees, and another is expert with cattle, and another is a great gardener, etc. Paul got into permaculture via gardening, but these days he doesn’t have time to garden.

Jocelyn explains (for those of you who don’t know) that Wheaton Labs is two pieces of land. The Lab was purchased as off-grid, totally raw former timber land. Basecamp is about two miles away from the Lab and it had a manufactured home, a garage and a big shop building. In the past 4+ years, many things have been built, on both properties.

Paul’s thinking that creating a permaculture community might cost $20 million. They are trying to develop this on a shoestring. There’s a paradox: you need cool things to draw in the people, but you need people to create the things. The bootcamp program is working great - the boots are being directed towards getting a lot of things done that need to be done. The boots are learning a lot, building in roundwood timber framing, cob, straw bale, all sorts of things.

Lab Goals:

ATI - Annualized Thermal Inertia test for Allerton Abbey. Allerton Abbey was suffering some structural issues, so logs were replaced, other logs were shored up. 2 engineers checked it out (they were visiting) and they feel like the building is now quite stable and safe - “belt and suspenders safe.. Apparently some pieces were removed a while back, and those pieces were actually structural.

They tried to test the ATI in a previous winter, but it became obvious that the uphill and downhill walls were super leaky and the winter wind blew right through. The “Peasant PDC” (May 22 - June 21) will be focused on turning Allerton Abbey into a permaculture paradise. It already has a lovely straw bale wall to replace one of the leaky walls. A junk pole fence will be built around it, hugelkultur beds will be built inside the fence for gardens, much cob and art will be made.

Then, hopefully next winter they can do a test of the ATI with Allerton Abbey.

Cooper Cabin is bigger than Allerton Abbey but it does not yet have the full earthen cover needed to test ATI there. 

After the Peasant PDC will be a more traditional two week PDC (June 24-July 7), but one that is aimed at folks who are starting out at a higher level. A certain amount of knowledge will be presumed. There will be microscopes. It will still be more homestead focused than urban or large farm (2 to 200 acres). (After that is the ATC: July 9 - 20.)

Freezer Wofati: Paul would like to build a wofati on a north slope, no windows, buried a little deeper than a wofati to live in, and multiple other tricks employed to try to direct cold air and capture the coldest air with a goal of having a space that stays below freezing year round, without electricity.

Lemon Tree: they have already built the earthworks for the lemon tree test, but there’s no lemon tree yet. Paul has looked at the site when it’s snowy, and it seems to be working, there’s no snow where the tree should grow. What is needed for this test is a person to live right nearby and manage the tree.

Perfect the Willow Feeder System: Paul would like to try having a ventilation pipe inside the wheeled can. He’d like to try different systems for breaking down the waste, like black soldier flies, but the main plan is to dry out and “mummify” the contents of the can. (For those who haven’t seen it - this is a facility with urine diversion, so only #2 goes into the cans. The cans are big wheeled trash cans, they are rarely handled due to their size.)

20+ Year Round Residents on the Lab: Maybe 15 to 18 one or two acre plots with singles and couples living there. The people will have their own smaller plot, but they will have access to the full 200 acre property. They will have like minded neighbors, one of the best things about living at the Lab.

Again, it would be great to have people with a lot of different interests: beef cattle, dairy cattle, pigs (to make ponds!), honeybees, chickens. It would be great to have someone who is interested in breeding chickens. When Paul bought the land, he had to set aside his own gardening in order to try to develop the community that will eventually achieve his gardening goals. It would be great to have somebody who is great at natural building, at roundwood furniture making.

Paul would like one person to carefully document how many calories they can raise on one permaculture acre, thus establishing a new record for how many calories could be raised from one acre in Montana. Ideally that person could be like Gert, a permaculture “millionaire.” (Thus called because if you gave her a million dollars, her life wouldn’t change - she’s already happy and doesn’t want for anything.)

Paul would like a person who innovates in natural building, who develops new less toxic ways to build. Jocelyn notes how many people are being sickened by their homes, from all the off-gassing.

More and better berm sheds - Now that an initial error was removed from the design, the berm shed is working out really well. These are made from logs and thus at Wheaton Laboratories the cost is very low. The one at basecamp has 12 bays, they are 10 feet by 10 feet each. They’re supposed to have a 5 foot eave, the one at basecamp doesn’t have an eave that size.

The cost for the berm shed at basecamp was less than $100. The one at basecamp was slow in being built - the initial builder said “trust me!” a lot, but Paul had to hire another person to go in and try to fix what the first person did. Nevertheless, it’s a cool structure, and very useful.

Paul can imagine at least one berm shed on just about every plot, also a big berm shed right at the entrance to the lab, so that people could park their cars near the gate in a berm shed cell. He would also like 20 cells of berm shed over at the bone yard, for storage.

Turn Allerton Abbey into a thing of Gertitude - Much of the work will be done during the peasant PDC. Paul would like to imagine that there will be a lovely couple that participates in the PDC and decides they would like to stay longer. Then eventually they could live in Allerton Abbey and make the ATI test happen. This could be like Emily and Tony, who met Paul in San Diego and ended up performing the “Montana winter in a tipi with a rocket mass heater” experiment. Allerton Abbey needs people living there (as does Cooper Cabin) to plant things, and protect the plants from the wildlife.

(Down at basecamp, they have one paddock fenced, and this keeps out the deer, but not the wild turkeys. Paul hopes that one day instead of feeding 100 wild turkeys, they can raise their own turkeys, and chickens, and maybe hogs. They can have more paddocks and more people, and move the animals through the paddock and gardens in a managed way.)

**Paul and Jocelyn saw 2 moose up on the lab right near Cooper Cabin. They ran off, which was different.

Water water everywhere - many attempts have been made at putting a well on the Lab. Two wells are up there right now, but they are just harvesting seep water, not good ground water. Paul is ready to sink the funds into drilling a professional well. It will be 300’-500’ deep, they can use a solar pump.

There’s an old creek bed on the property, but it’s still dry. There was water there in the spring for a few days - that’s the first time that’s happened. The goal is to bring back the creek. If we can plant a lot of tap-rooted trees, they can bring up water and re-form the creek. (This creek bed was where Jocelyn fell and broke her wrist while they were recording a podcast.)

Paul wants to create creeks even where there have not been creeks previously. Planting more trees, non-conifer trees, will help. The ATC folks last spring built an air well and it should start to produce water. The one recently built is kind of short, mostly because of where it was placed. Paul thinks it might be able to make 9 gallons a day on a hot and muggy day.

Paul would like to have lots of ponds. There are a couple of ponds up there, but none of them hold water year round. He’d like to see someone manage some pigs so that they can help a pond become well sealed.

Paul would like to create something he calls a humus well. When he was looking at land, he saw a place that had a road cutting through forest, and on the uphill side of the road, the forest had never been harvested. It was a hot and smoky day, it had been a very dry summer. For about 200 yards, the road ran next to the thick patch of conifers and there was water dripping on to the road (!). Paul would like to make a ditch 15’ wide and 2’ deep, lined with something to hold the water and have it shaped as a giant shallow V, so that water could be collected from it.

This is similar to terrace wells that Sepp Holzer creates. He creates a terrace, then there’s a well to which it drains.

It would also be cool to have multiple dew ponds. These don’t have water flowing into them, they collect water in the winter time and hold it. Paul would like to have a series of solar pumps that move the water up to the top of the property.

Final thing on the water wish list: a natural swimming pool.

Improve all the roads: eventually Paul’s hoping the traffic will be bikes and pedestrians, but for now, the cars are needed. He feels like the roads need to be nice enough that a 2 wheel drive care can make it around, even in the rain and snow.

A living fence for the perimeter - multiple people have talked about this, but it’s not reality yet. Paul feels like a living fence is the way to go for the perimeter. Jocelyn bought some Hawthorne saplings and hired someone to plant them as the beginning of a living fence, but the recent drought probably did them in.

Three season bee forage near the bee hive - we need people to help optimize plants for bees. Similarly, we could capture a bunch of swarms this spring.

Find permies to buy adjacent properties. Two parcels that adjoin Paul’s property have been sold, not to permies. Paul gave 7 tours to people who said they were planning to buy land, nobody did. Now he wonders if they just wanted to find out where Paul lives. Anybody that buys this property has to self-finance, because you’re buying it from a timber company.

Wofati bath house and laundry - this might be the ultimate purpose for Allerton Abbey. Still, it would be great to have some sort of bath tub, and light, and houseplants, in a wofati. With a washing machine for clothes as well.

Basecamp Goals:

Currently there are 6 bootcamp slots. Paul would like to see another leader materialize, then there could be 12 bootcamp slots. This would take cash, cash that could be made by someone who figures out how to rent out the 5 structures with rocket mass heaters inside to interested folks.

Relevant Threads

Wheaton labs
peasant PDC
Copper Cabin
Berm Sheds
The Story of Gert
2018 Appropriate Technology Course
Air/Humus Well

Support the Empire

Help support the empire and get all of the podcasts in a bundle here in the digital market at permies.

To support production of these podcasts, make a donation here at Paul's Patreon page.



This podcast was made possible thanks to:

Lisa Goodspeed
Keith Kuhnsman
thomas adams
Jocelyn Campbell
Julia Mason
Dominic Crolius
Josh Phillips
wade L
Suleiman ALAQEL
Ash Jackson is The Scrollbard
Jason Hower
Bill Crim
Full Name
Doug Barth
Miroslav Ultrama
James Tutor
David Ingraham


Listen Online
Download

Get all of the podcasts in convenient, giant zip files
Subscribe on iTunes

Summary

Credit: Julia Winter

Paul continues his conversation with Chris McClellan aka Uncle Mud about Rocket Mass heaters. They start this podcast talking about the Minnie Mouse, who now lives in the Love Shack. She’s a rocket mass heater contained inside a barrel, inside a wooden structure. Peter cleverly lined the back of the barrel very tightly with bricks, so that the stove doesn’t radiate a bunch of heat backwards to the wall. Thus, the heat shield is built in - no metal or brick had to be put over the wooden wall. Mud points out that this heat shield is also functioning as thermal mass, which is awesome double function action.

Minnie Mouse throws off a lot of heat quickly, but she also holds onto some heat, making her sort of a hybrid stove. She has a metal core - a metal wood feed and a metal burn tunnel. The heat riser is not metal. The reason this works is that the wood feed and burn tunnel are both air cooled. Steel will spall at 1600 degrees F and melts at 2600. You need to keep steel around 1400 degrees. This is done by having a smaller system - a 4 inch J tube system (4 inch batchbox would probably get too hot). The heat riser is vermiculite and can take a bit more heat. Paul thinks that if it was a 6 inch system, you couldn’t have a metal core.

Mud notes that “mild steel” will become challenged at 906 degrees F. You can use metal for a rocket cooker, but that's because it never runs for very long. Peter uses metal to test various designs, because he’s just seeing how things work, he’s not going to put it into someone’s house. Metal cores tend to fail.

Mud says that although you can “hook” people into RMH with the economy of heating with less wood, and cheaper wood, the real value is in the increased safety. Paul agrees “Hey, you wanna save some money?” is the calling card of the RMH. Heat your home with 1/10th the wood *and* you don’t burn down your house with a chimney fire.

The Liberator is UL listed, so that should make your insurance company happy. It is a fully steel system that uses fins to dissipate heat. It’s a 4” system, another reason it works. (It’s not as efficient as ceramic cored rocket mass heaters for this reason.) Paul is still hoping someone will develop a non-metal shippable core. When he’s seen rocket mass heaters made with metal cores, they don’t seem to last. If something was made of ceramic, then you can have a 6” or 8” system. You can’t do a larger system in metal, it will get too hot and then it will fail. Paul has seen many people build 6 or 8 inch systems in metal, and they work grea... until they fail.

Rocket mass heaters with basic firebrick cores do great - they heat a home for years, no problem. We need more videos of the good builds, to compete with all the flaming freak shows of death that you can find on YouTube.

Moving on to the tipi. The rocket mass heater there was no longer working well. Ernie went up there to check it out. He thinks the core had some silt (instead of clay) and over time, this led to breakdown and holes in the core. Where the burn tunnel met the riser, there were holes leaking into the manifold, thus bypassing the heat riser. Ernie opened it up and rebuilt it with insulated firebrick and now it works great again.

The double shoe box is a batch box system that doesn’t have a heat riser. Instead, it has another box above the batch box, with a slot in the top of the bottom box. The fire goes up through the slot and does the cool ramshorn thing in the upper chamber to mix the gases and get the secondary combustion. They’ve built one up at Allerton Abbey. It’s got a glass cooktop, so you can see the curlicue flame path (and cook on it as well).

Having two chambers solves a problem that batch box heaters often had. People would overfill the batch box and it would interfere with fire leaving via the back wall. Then the fire wouldn’t burn cleanly. Now, the flame leaves via a slot in the top, so it’s much harder to block. The stove in Allerton Abbey has a heating bench attached to it, an open stratification type bench. The batch box has a casserole lid door, and once they built a bit more cob to get the glass further from the fire that’s working well. The thing burns really cleanly. The exhaust has no smell “not even like socks.”

Mud says there are lots of new designs showing that the secondary combustion doesn’t require a barrel with an insulated heat riser. People are making really interesting designs, especially with cooktops. As long as the system moves air well, multiple forms can lead to secondary combustion of the wood gases and thus impressive efficiency. Paul feels that the key factors that make a heater efficient are that the gases move through an area that’s over 1400 degrees (up to 3000 degrees) and that the exhaust is not nearly as hot as that of a conventional wood stove. He’d like to see how efficient these stoves can become - there is still room for optimization.

Mud says efficient is cool, but we’ve got to get people to use the things. Lots of people hate the idea of feeding a J-tube system every 20 minutes, so having the batch box system can help. The usefulness of the cookers may help these appeal to different people as well as the different aesthetic (no barrel). When he proposed building a rocket mass heater in his home, his wife said that saving $150 in fuel was not worth tearing up the living room. More designs, more choices in shape and function, this is how we get lots of different people using this better technology. Burn the fuel in your stove, don’t let it build up in your chimney to later burn down your house.

Paul says we’re getting to the point (in design) where a person might heat their house with sticks from the yard, plus garbage. If you pay for garbage hauling, now you’re saving money a couple of different ways. One idea for saving energy was to plug the chimney at the roof line, but Paul is here to say - don’t do this. Humans being fallible, somebody’s going to build a fire when the chimney is blocked, and it takes too long to figure out there’s a problem.

The last item on Paul’s list is the bun warmer. They already talked about it, but Paul wanted to note a couple more things. The original ring of fire used half barrels not as stratification chambers but sort of as ducting. Over time the ring of fire pulled sand into the barrels. Mud took over building the bun warmer from Ernie (whose leg started to trouble him and he had to take a break). He saw this as an opportunity for students to build a basic thing with their own hands. They made it a little harder than it needed to be, trying to bend barrels. In retrospect, it should have been built as a long bench, but having it bent in a U shape allows folks to sit and talk amongst themselves. Having it set up as a stratification chamber allows the heat to equalize all over. Paul says yeah, the surface was 85 degrees anywhere you might choose to sit - very nice. Mud says the fundamentals of the bun warmer are very cool, and he’s thinking of building an herb dryer using a similar design. (He also mentioned constructing a clothes dryer using a rocket core, and that sounds cool -JW)

Paul wishes that a thousand times more people knew about rocket mass heaters. Why would anybody buy a conventional wood stove when you could have a rocket mass heater?. OK, some of it is backlash from the lame so-called rocket mass heaters that people see. Still, there’s still a mystery here - come on, they are cleaner than natural gas heaters!. How do we get this information into more brains. We need to have more rocket heating jamborees - all over.

Relevant Threads

2018 Appropriate Technology Course in Montana
2018 Permaculture Design Course (PDC) for Homesteaders
384 - Uncle Mud - part 2
all of the rocket mass heaters and rocket stoves at wheaton labs (with pics!)
Rocket mass heater forum
pebble style rmh - in the fisher price house
Better Wood Heat: DIY Rocket Mass Heater Videos
Podcast 315 - More on Rocket Mass Heaters with Ernie and Erica Wisner Part 1
all of the rocket mass heaters and rocket stoves at wheaton labs (with pics!)
The Liberator.

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This podcast was made possible thanks to:

Lisa Goodspeed
Keith Kuhnsman
thomas adams
Jocelyn Campbell
Julia Mason
Dominic Crolius
Josh Phillips
wade L
Suleiman ALAQEL
Ash Jackson is The Scrollbard
Jason Hower
Bill Crim
Full Name
Doug Barth
Miroslav Ultrama
James Tutor
David Ingraham
any more pictures of the cottage rocket mass heater? Some people are having difficulties to visualize it from the discussion in this thread
1 month ago
I just posted part 2

Here is a link to the 2018 Appropriate Technology Course in Montana

There is one picture of the cottage rocket mass heater  here but it is not completed.