Ann Blevins

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since Aug 07, 2012
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Recent posts by Ann Blevins

My nickname as a child was "pinky" which I later found out was because I always had a red bottom. Now I know that it was a dairy and/or wheat allergy. I was formula fed from the start, so it was probably a cow-milk allergy. To me, it's a no-brainer that it could be a food allergy causing the problems (I'm surprised this hasn't been suggested to you yet). If it was me, I'd try cutting out dairy for a couple of weeks to see what effect it has, and if it doesn't change, then try cutting out wheat and/or gluten for a couple of weeks. Adding in probiotic foods could also help - kefir, yogurt, sauerkraut, etc. Rubbing fresh kefir directly on her rash could also help (kefir is like yogurt in steroids in terms of it's beneficial yeasts/bacteria).
7 years ago
If the problem is gallbladder, then yes, I might want to start with a low-fat diet. But the gall-bladder is cleared out only when there is fat in the diet - otherwise it stagnates and can create gallstones. Dr Natasha McBride (the GAPS diet) talks about how to go about this by slowly adding in fats. Her diet heals and seals the gut wall and allows the digestive system to rebuild. I'd highly recommend reading her book and the online resources (it's basically a sub-set of WAPF diet for gut healing). Also look into liver/gallbladder flushes - there is a lot of information online about these - they are pretty intense though - not something to take on lightly.

In terms of how long to try things out - I think it depends on what you are trying out. If you are trying a whole foods diet to heal leaky gut, it will probably never work (in my opinion), but if you are trying out GAPS to heal a leaky gut, then I'm guessing almost everyone would see improvements in 6 months (some in days, others in weeks, but everyone by 6 months). We have been on GAPS for two years now, and can finally eat cheese and raw milk again (we have been dairy free for 6 years) because we have healed our guts through a good diet, and time. Also, as I mentioned on another thread, it took close to a year on GAPS for my sons warts to just disappear.
7 years ago
My 9 year old son had about 60 warts over his two hands and lips a couple of years ago, and my 13 year old son had 5 or 6. We tried everything we could think of - the ACV, the duct tape, different homeopathics/ointments, the garlic, banana skin, etc, etc, but nothing worked. We went on GAPS two years ago, so were eating a very nutrient dense diet - nothing happened the first 10 months or so, in fact more came, then they started disappearing and by the time school started the second year they were totally gone - very cool!
7 years ago
I also have scoliosis and was told by a chiropractor about 20 years ago that I would always have pain and have to see a chiropractor. However, at this point I rarely see a chiropractor and rarely have any pain. My shoulders have straightened out so much that I don't notice them being uneven any more unless I really look closely at the muscles. Stretching helps, but I don't do much of that and just do regular "around the farm" type exercise. While I've been on GAPS the last two years, I've been eating an organic, mostly whole foods diet for the last 20 or so, and believe it's more what I am not eating that makes the difference than what I am eating. Cutting out all the processed foods and replacing them with whole foods is a huge step. Not having any cavities in the last 20 years (but many before that) shows, to me, that my bones must be healthier, since teeth are a form of bone.

The book "Cure Tooth Decay" is an excellent book on repairing teeth (and hence bone) health. It provides detailed information on the most nutrient dense diet to restore tooth heath (in my opinion, beyond Dr Weston Price's Nutrition and Physical Degeneration, and Sally Fallon's Nourishing Traditions) - I highly recommend it if you want to take your bone/tooth health further.
7 years ago
My son and I just got back from a 2 day intensive at Joel Salatin's Polyface Farm in Virginia (Joel is the "good" farmer presented in Food, Inc). Joel made the point that farmers need an incentive to go back to grass-based farming - it may be that the drought and higher corn prices provide that incentive.

The online film "Edible City: The Movie" on YouTube is worth watching too - shows how people are taking back their power.
7 years ago
We have milk goats - each produces about 1/2 a gallon a day, and we only milk once per day. Since I enjoy taking a break from milking, my neighbor milks two days a week and keeps the milk those days. She also buys the alfalfa for the goats, so it's a win-win for both families.
7 years ago
Yes, there is still gelatin in there, it's just diluted, and perhaps not very much based on the type of chicken, but still worth eating!
7 years ago
Kim - you didn't say if you were overweight to begin with? I was underweight and have gained enough to be a good weight now, so yes, I did gain, but not overly so. Just gained a little more cuddle factor :> (i.e 120lb at 5'4")
7 years ago

I'm not Sarah - but I have a lot of stock experience. I would first suggest trying less water - yes you'll get less stock, but it will be more concentrated. I always used to put too much water in mine and it wouldn't gel until I started using less water.

Also, if it's a store bought chicken, they are processed at about 8 weeks of age. 8 weeks does not give the birds much time to form gelatin in their tissues, so you really aren't going to get a lot in your stock. If you ever get a chance, use an old laying hen - they are FULL of gelatin - making stock with them is a very different experience.

Ann
7 years ago

Hi Sarah,

I am also a Weston A Price Foundation chapter leader here in California, although fairly new to it.

Our family has been on GAPS (Gut and Psychology Syndrome diet recommended by Dr Natasha Campbell McBride to heal gut issues) for two years now, and have just introduced raw milk, which is technically beyond GAPS. We all seem to be doing well with the milk which is really nice as I have been milking our goats for about 4 years now and finally 3 of us can drink it (my husband has been drinking it all along). However, my 9 year old son still hasn't really got over his exercise induced asthma during this two years. It is certainly much better than it has been in the past, and he hasn't used an inhaler in over a year, but it hasn't disappeared. The milk doesn't seem to be affecting it one way or the other as far as I can tell.

I'm wondering if you have any suggestions on how to help the asthma specifically?

Thanks,
Ann
7 years ago