Win a copy of The Ethical Meat Handbook this week in the Food Choices forum!

Rob Clinch

+ Follow
since Oct 15, 2012
Rob likes ...
chicken fish forest garden
Zone 5B, NB, Canada
Apples and Likes
Apples
Total received
2
In last 30 days
0
Total given
0
Likes
Total received
17
Received in last 30 days
0
Total given
26
Given in last 30 days
0
Forums and Threads
Scavenger Hunt
expand First Scavenger Hunt

Recent posts by Rob Clinch

Great set up mike, next winter I will definitely have a compost coop set up. It just makes too much sense not to.
4 months ago
In my experience with aquaculture on both home (300 gallons) and commercial scale (1 million+ salmon smolt/ year) it’s not the actual fish that cause a smell, it’s fish feed, dead fish and moisture issues caused by poor air circulation that causes any bad smells. If your water stinks it most likely is caused by inadequate aeration or using high fat feed that leaches oils onto the surface of the tank which will then make its way to your grow beds. Red wiggler worms will help breaking it down in beds but it could still have some smell.
4 months ago
IBC work perfectly well for small set ups and are a great upcycling use (as long as you know what was in them first!). Having them in the cellar is fine as long as precautions are taken. Foil on floor trusses definitely doesn’t hurt but there is no substitute for proper ventilation, if the lids are preventing moisture from escaping the tanks then they are also preventing gas exchange between the water and the atmosphere. If they are are loose enough for proper gas exchange then they are loose enough to allow moisture out. Even a single medium size  aquarium with a lid can cause mould problems in a room with out good air exchange, I found this out the hard way, a long time ago, as a teenager, in my bedroom at my parents house!
4 months ago
One major concern about the fish tanks in the basement, much more important than smell, is moisture management. You will need to have a lot of active ventilation or the humidity will cause big problems with mould, mildew and eventually rot. It can definitely be done but it is important to do it right. Another option for you might be to place the tanks in the floor of the greenhouse, under your grow beds. Then they would be shaded from the sun and the earth would buffer against temperature swings. Commercial fish hatcheries in the north place their tanks at least partially below grade for this buffering effect. How big are your tanks?
4 months ago
Welcome Darrell, I read your book 5+ years ago and was very inspired by it. Bioshelters make so much sense to me that I can’t imagine starting a farm without one in the design, I look forward to hearing about the updates from your place!
4 months ago
I’m really enjoying following along with your project Wayne! I’m sure you must have mentioned already but I couldn’t see it as I skimmed back through, roughly how large of an area are you working on?
4 months ago
I really like the meadow look! I’m sure the bee also do. I’m planning to overseed a wildflower mix into my zone 3/4 lawn behind my shed as well as starting a few flats of select perennials to give them a bit of a head start against the conventional lawn. I think that if you keep up with dead heading things then your neighbors will think of it more as a tended garden than a bunch of overgrown weeds in your lawn. That’s my plan at least.
5 months ago
Does anyone have an update to share on there Sepp Rye? Mine did not over winter for me. We had a wet and somewhat warmer winter this year, and as I’m on a smallish island we had little snowcover. I’m not sure if those conditions contributed to them not making it through the winter or not.  How did everyone else’s do so far?
If you want the goose to protect the duck than you should only have one, if there is two then they will protect themselves. This is the same as llamas and donkeys that are used as livestock guardians. For best results raise a single gosling with your flock so it bonds to the ducks, that way it knows that is it’s job. In my experience with a pair of geese they will not protect anything but each other, they used to chase chickens away that would get too close, I’m not sure if the same would go for ducks.

Justin Rhodes has a few videos about guard geese, he uses one with each of his chicken flocks.
8 months ago
I fully believe that what you are hoping to accomplish is not only possible, but is what we really need to do with our entire food system. More localized, many less petroleum miles, carbon sequestering food that enhances the environment instead of poisoning it. I think that the Savanna Institute http://www.savannainstitute.org/ is a great place to start, also as others have mentioned, Mark Shepard’s New Forest Farm is both an example of a 25 year old, +/-100 acre food savanna in Wisconsin and a great business model for such a system. I recommend contacting him, I believe he does consulting work as well.

I think that multiple smaller food savannas give much more resilience than one huge farm. By smaller I don’t mean 1000 little 5 acre farms, but small like 100+ acre farms instead. This is important with the unpredictable seasonal weather that is becoming much more common. For example, a smaller farm in the northeast may be hit by a late frost that wipes out the apple crop, however another smaller farm 100 miles south is completely safe from the same frost and has a bumper crop. If you have one 750 acre farm instead you could lose the entire years supply of a crop for various reasons, but 3, 250 acre farms you stand a much better chance of not losing an entire crop in a given year.

I have dreams of feeding my entire island community of approximately 2500 people with food systems like these, it is not something that can happen over night, but a long term 20 year plan certainly could.
8 months ago