Mark Boucher

+ Follow
since Jan 17, 2013
Apples and Likes
Apples
Total received
1
In last 30 days
0
Total given
0
Likes
Total received
34
Received in last 30 days
0
Total given
1
Given in last 30 days
0
Forums and Threads
Scavenger Hunt
expand Pioneer Scavenger Hunt

Recent posts by Mark Boucher

1 part pine tar
3 parts boiled linseed oil (or raw)
1 part turpentine

This works well for dry softwoods: cedar, yellow pine, etc. Apply 2-3 initial coats, then one coat per year.

It will turn black with exposure to the sun. This protects the wood from UV damage.

Selecting BLO or raw depends on your climate, as well as the material available. Most boiled linseed oil sold in the states consists of raw linseed oil with heavy metal dryers added. Check solventfreepaint.com for alternatives, or make your own.
Climate-wise, consider raw if you live in a dry climate. I live in the southeast where raw would never dry.

I'm a cabinetmaker with a predilection for old-fashioned low tech stuff. I also don't like too much extra work, so I use Penofin for matte finish outside woodwork: full disclaimer.
1 year ago
I'm looking for some information about fermenting and aging green persimmon juice. Has anyone had success with this process who's willing to share? I'll mill and press the fruit to get the juice, but I'd like some more info about how to ferment and age before bottling. I assume open vat with wild yeast fermentation. Stir occasionally. At some point decant, then age open or closed for a couple of years? I'm accustomed to fermenting for alcohol, but haven't tried an open ferment yet. I'm thinking I'd like to give this a go next year, perhaps even trying the same process with black walnut. Any opinions?
4 years ago
Sure, some chops are good, but that's the thing about developing hand skills: it's cumulative. Doing creates the ability to do. You don't have to be Mario Batali to cook dinner, nor do you have to be Sam Maloof to make shavings.
What's the harm in trying? Hand planes are inexpensive, can be useful for generations, are not obnoxious to use, and are highly unlikely to take an inexperienced hand off. And otherwise, you've got a lot of board to work with. If you can whittle through both halves without making two joinable edges, then fine: take your pile of shavings and go make a plant happy.
4 years ago
If you're still mulling this about, a hand plane and a machinist's square are all the tools you'd really need. The plane needs to be longish, something like a Record #05. Plane both edges down to clean wood, making sure that they are straight and square. For basic tutorials, search "edge joining" or "edge jointing" (both are common) and "winding sticks". In order to apply the clamping pressure:
1. Lay the two pieces on a work table.
2. Attach blocks to the table along the edges of the workpiece that are parallel to the crack.
3. Apply glue to one edge of the joint, spreading thoroughly.
4. Drive wedges or tapered shims between the blocks and workpiece to apply pressure to the joint.
5. Let it sit for a day before stressing the joint.

The tip about Tightbond is good; i'd use Tightbond II. You should fix this if only because hand skills are worth developing.
4 years ago
A saw mill is the typical way. Look for a sawyer with a portable mill, that can be set up on your property for the day. Otherwise, it depends on what tools you have available. You could split, then clean up with a power plane or hand plane if you have lots of extra time. Dress two edges square on a joiner, then bandsaw the other two edges. If you're splitting with a froe and a helper, then you can get reasonably consistent posts by marking the split, and following the marks. It's not a sawn look, but the froe offers some amount of control.
5 years ago
Wow! What some great gardens!
Matt Davey, I love the diversity. Are you getting lots of volunteers, or are you mostly seeding/planting?
5 years ago
art
Looking good Alex. What's your mulching process? And thanks, Gail. I guess that's the good thing about investing energy; your back can't be sore forever, right?
5 years ago
art
Cool! So, please post some pictures of your garden! Raised, hugel, urban, whatcha got? I'm wanting to transition my raised bed to a no-till type garden. I'm leaning towards direct seeding the approx. 10' x 30' area with a general diversity of veggies and cover, and staging seedings to fill in during the season. There's no wood under there, only mulch on top, but I've only scratched the surface minimally in the last two years, so I'm not sure if I want to dig it up. I've been reading at permies a lot, and think that this site is a great resource. I'm in Athens, GA, and have recently realized that something will grow here year-round... and so I'm trying to figure out a sustainable system that uses mostly seeding and cut-and-drop as the imputs, and harvesting, of course. I appreciate any advice, but would love to see any pictures of your gardens; lots of info in a picture! I hope that winter finds you well; the pic above is a little taste of spring.
5 years ago
art
Let's see if this works...
5 years ago
art
Lodge also "makes" skillets in China. Not sure which ones WM sells; find a "made in" brand on the product. It takes a while to get the preseasoning out, but their skillets are fine afterwards.
5 years ago