Dan Allen

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since Jan 20, 2013
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Recent posts by Dan Allen

I bought my first ten acres on a land contract with money from selling firewood. Then bought  a hobby mill to build my house. Then started making money with the mill. No job from day one. Then paid off my land and bought the 13 acres next door and a new 4x4 loader tractor. Then paid off the loader tractor and bought a new professional sawmill, all with lumber sales from reclaimed trees. I'm 34 and could retire at any time. No mortgage. I own all my land and my own home debt free. We sell produce and campfire wood at the end of the driveway. But the real ticket that pays the way is the sawmill.  I never went to college, nor graduated high school. It's just my wife and my son and myself. It also allowed us to buy land in Florida to farm in the winter. Free and clear. It was a lot of hard work and broken bones but somehow I've survived it all. I also raised hogs and cattle for meat but have since become a pescatarian/vegetarian and found the real profit is in the dirt.
1 month ago

Chris Kott wrote:Again, burning is bad. It will disperse the most volatile elements into the surrounding environment, and create situations in which you don't want to grow food.

At that point, better to just leave the plastc bits. Mulch overtop of them to keep them out of the sun, and just don't worry about them.

Better than creating a bunch of dioxins so the soil can be pretty.

-CK



I stand corrected and I would no longer recommend the burning of plastic. I thought maybe the more volatile elements would be destroyed by burning. Please disregard my above-mentioned idea. I looked up dioxins and indeed they are released by burning. And no amount is insignificant. In retrospect I think that the best option would be to rake it up. Thanks.
1 month ago
A spore print is where you lay the mushroom gills down on a piece of paper to determine the color of the spores. However myself I prefer to only eat mushrooms that I know we'll enough to not require a spore print. They don't really look anything like oyster mushrooms nor are they growing on a tree like an oyster would.
1 month ago
Pretty sure they are deer Shields, pluteus cervinus . Some people eat them, but I don't think they are a choice edible.
1 month ago
Before it all gets mixed in the soil you could burn it all with a propane weedkiller, reduce it all to ash and then mulch away. Just a thought.
1 month ago
I see that happen with seedling peaches here in zone 5 Michigan as well. Usually with younger seedlings or new growth on older seedling peaches after coppicing. My theory is that they are naturally a more warm temperate yet adaptable species. So as the branches get older they adapt to the seasons. I see this to a lesser extent on apricots as well.
Bladder campion, early spring green, high in omega 3
Winter cress
Violets, these are the three plants that begin growth in the spring before anything else. And they are all delicious, but of the three I would rate bladder campion the highest. And last but not least nettles of course
2 months ago

Mike Jay wrote:I have some 1.5 year old hens and some pullets that have just started laying.  I figured I'd always be able to recognize them by their feather patterns but now I have so many black ones (no white spots or glimmers) that I'm starting to not be able to tell them apart.  I figure in another year or two I'll wish I had a way to tell 3 year old hens from 1 year old.  Is there a way to band them or tag them that won't hurt or cause sores/problems?  For another month or two I'll still be able to tell them apart...

One idea was to put a black zip tie around one ankle.  Leave it loose and snip off the excess.



I always just judge by the leg scales, young chickens have smooth shiny leg scales and older hens have dull, rough scales that begin to peel back somewhat getting more raggedy as they age.
2 months ago
On making warm spots;  you can also take advantage of warm spots over your septic tank and drain field . I have a 6x8 greenhouse on my septic tank and a 10 x 20 on my drain field, which allows me to capture the rising heat, and extend my growing season at least a month in either direction as well as overwinter less cold hardy species without the addition of added heating. For instance I had a peach pit germinate from compost in the 6x8 in February without any additional heat, it was just buried in the floor by accident, but for zone 5, that is pretty early.
2 months ago