nick man

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since Feb 02, 2013
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Recent posts by nick man

I was very happy with the way the copper retained the heat. The bell would hit well over 500- 550f near the top before I added the copper. The copper never got above 180.

Yes I also like the look of copper and stainless.
Thanks.
Nick.
6 years ago
I have used my stove for cooking as much as heating. But this year I installed if for good in a small one room building. I have a cooking stone on the top of the bell and a twin bowl on the top of the stone. I was trying to take the heat from around the bell and move it into the cooking chamber. So I added copper sheet metal around the bell. I added 1" copper pipe to the bell last year. Now with the 1" gap between the sheet copper and the bell, I have a nice amount of heat that moves up to a new larger 22" stainless steel bowl on top. The upper cooking chamber on top of the cooking stone is made up of three stainless steel bowls. A 15" inside, 16" middle and a 22" outside. I did place a heat blanket in between the 15" and 16" bowl. The temp are much better. I reach 550 degrees on the stone very quick. The inside temp at the top of the bowl is with in 100 degrees of the stone.

I also added a small exhaust fan by the stove. I want to keep the room temps as low as I can so I can still cook in the summer. It worked well, the room never got above 75f, outside was around 65f. I will see when it get over 90f in the summer.

BTW the pizza was good.

Thanks

Nick
6 years ago
You can built it with legs on the bottom This will give you an air gap to help keep high heat for getting to the floor.
6 years ago

bob golding wrote: i am sure if you added forced draught to a rocket you would get a better burn, but adding too much will produce Nox which is almost as bad as CO. i think trying to add the exhaust will be counter productive and cool the fire with too much nitrogen as pointed out. if they burn below the point Nox is being produced that is the maximum efficiency you are going to get out of wood without pollution from Nox



You are on point here. In the automotive world they run an EGR valve [exhaust gas recirculation] to help with this. At first they worked off of a check valve and engine vacuum. Later on this were controlled by the PCM. Some of the newer cars no longer use them at all. Has anyone before tried adding a O2 sensor to the flue and then use it to control a damper to limit the inlet air at the feed tube. With a car you add or reduce fuel as needed to maintain the AFR[air fuel ratio]. We cannot add or reduce fuel as needed, so maybe we can add or remove air as needed. This can help with HC and CO output. Nox is much harder. The EGR helps with that.

Thanks Nick
6 years ago

Satamax Antone wrote:

nick man wrote:A turbo does not send exhaust back into the engine. It does add boost /charge air, 5,10 psi or what ever the system is set for. The boosted charge is packed with much more 02. So you may be on to something there. In the old days the Blacksmith used a bellow to add air and get the fire cranking. I use shop air to restart if I let the fire die. As long as I see red coals at the bottom it will work. I drop a few small sticks and give it a small blast of shop air. The fire jumps right up and gets the sticks burning. Thanks Nick



http://www.gas-turbines.com/nt6/index.html

http://www.gas-turbines.com/t98-nt-xx/index.html



Great info on turbines and how it works. I responded to how turbos work in cars and trucks. Turbos on cars and trucks do not pump exhaust back into engines. That was my point.

Thanks Nick
6 years ago
A turbo does not send exhaust back into the engine. It does add boost /charge air, 5,10 psi or what ever the system is set for. The boosted charge is packed with much more 02. So you may be on to something there. In the old days the Blacksmith used a bellow to add air and get the fire cranking. I use shop air to restart if I let the fire die. As long as I see red coals at the bottom it will work. I drop a few small sticks and give it a small blast of shop air. The fire jumps right up and gets the sticks burning. Thanks Nick
6 years ago
McMaster Carr sells the glass. I used the one they sell for over two years now in rmh without any problems. Thanks Nick.
6 years ago
It was a hard choice. I looked at heat loss, surface temps, draft and flow. No I am just kidding. I use what I had in the back of the shop. It is thick wall and I was looking for some mass to add to it. I will be keeping track of the temps on it along with the time it takes to hit them. Maybe it will be a waste of time. I have no idea. It does look neat sitting there. More then a few people that have stopped by the shop seem to like it.

Thanks Nick
6 years ago
Cold out there today. Temps are dropping. Nice and warm here. More photos.

Thanks

Nick
6 years ago
I just fired up my new rocket heater this evening. It started right up and came up to good temps very fast. No smoke,I mean no smoke at all backing up. Made some changes from my first try lasted year. Some based on the members and some based on what I have seen. It is a 4" burner that stands 5'6" tall. The main bell is made from 12 gauge sheet of 24"x48". It is made up of four cut and foled sheets. The size is 13.5x13x48". The second bell tower is made from 5" tube steel that is 1/4" thick 5x5x48. The base is 12x 1/8th steel plate. The bottom is 1.4" thick. It stands on five adjustable legs. The burn chamber and riser is made up of 2600 degree refactory brick. The rear exit chamber is 12x12x12. I lined it with fire brick, thinking it may keep more heat from going up the flue. The flue exit out the back of the base start with a 7" hole and then is reduced to 6" before the last 4" reduce to the 4" flue. The flue stands 15' high before it goes out the wall. Then it goes up another 3'. I added some cooling fins to the flue. just trying to grab more heat from going out the wall. The feed tube is made from 1/4" stainless steel. I drilled 27 1/2" holes at the top of it. This helped in two main areas. It keeps the top of the feed tube cool to the touch. It also stops the back smoke from lowering the sealed feed point. I will post more numbers next week and maybe have it painted by then. Thanks

Nick.
6 years ago