John Rogers

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since Mar 23, 2013
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Recent posts by John Rogers

Got 'em both. They were both in the gmail primary tab.
Seth, if you're still monitoring this topic, are you in contact with Ulysses Martin in Tacoma? He's an Evergreen student that is deeply involved with permaculture and aquaponics in the Tacoma area. He and his team were finalists in the Tacoma Green Infrastructure Challenge earlier this year.

Message me and I'll send you his email address.

John
3 years ago
A new permaculture educational program is slated to start in January 2016 in western Washington state. As of a meeting I attended yesterday, the very likely location will be on property adjacent to the Soldier's Home in Orting, WA, about ten miles SE of Sumner. The core curriculum will be a 72 hour course that is certified through the Permaculture Institute North America (PINA), with some additional instruction on mycology and natural and green building. Additional curriculum on related topics will be available as the program grows. The program is geared towards military veterans, but all prospective students will be considered for admission. For veteran students, the school does qualify for use of GI Bill and VA Vocational Rehabilitation education benefits, and agreements are currently being drafted with Washington colleges regarding how much transfer credit will be awarded for completion of the program.

If this sounds like something you would be interested in as a student, or a supporter, please visit the website at VETS_CAFE for more information, and sign up for the newsletter on the Contact tab. Things are moving fast right now. Faster than the website can be updated. So the email newsletter is the best source of current information.

If you know any veterans or active service members who might be interested in using their education benefits to learn permaculture in a hands-on environment alongside with other current and former members of the military, please pass the website link on to them.

John
3 years ago

Gary Lewis wrote:
Who is making a real living online (and how)?


I made about $60k/year from 2009-2012 doing online marketing for a small software company. It was good while it lasted, but the gig ended virtually overnight and left me without what had become my primary income stream. Over those four years I had become complacent and ended all of my own online projects, so I had nothing to fall back on. That was a hard lesson learned. So many things can kill online income streams... Just be wary. Building a community is a good foundation, then find ways to leverage that community. (note: by leverage I don't mean take advantage of). Observe how Paul has leveraged the Permies community into several wildly successful Kickstarter campaigns. Part of that is due to the size of the community, but more importantly, the community members like and trust him. I know of several people who have built online communities similar to this one in structure (basically a forum), and when they decided it was time to quit, sold the online properties for seven figures. Even when you consider that those properties were built over a period of years, that's still a pretty good payday.
3 years ago
The article addresses exactly that issue, and discusses specific things that this particular seller is doing to stand out from the crowd.

"Many Etsy shop owners feel lucky to sell 10 pieces a month, and 65% of Etsy sellers make less than $100 from their shops in a year. Crafters usually need day jobs to support their hobbies."
3 years ago
When producing food doesn't generate enough income...

Check out this million dollar Etsy seller.

http://www.fastcodesign.com/3042352/how-one-knitter-makes-almost-1-million-a-year-on-etsy
4 years ago
I've been seeing this pop up on Facebook, and had only previously heard of it in the old Tumbleweeds newspaper comics. Always wondered what it was...
4 years ago
Intentional community is a very broad term that basically means people living together for some common purpose or shared values. Some examples are communes, ecovillages, and monasteries. A handful of families constructing homes on a shared piece of land to ensure they have cool neighbors is an intentional community. Check out http://ic.org, where you'll find a wealth of information.

John
4 years ago
Five or so years ago there was a post-apocalyptic social experiment quasi-reality show called The Colony on the Discovery Channel. In one of the episodes they successfully ran a petroleum gas powered electrical generator on wood gas, and I was blown away. That was my first exposure to wood gasifiers. Last year on the History Channel show Mountain Men, Eustace Conway and Preston Roberts successfully converted an old pickup truck to run on woodgas using a gasifier constructed pretty much of junk that was lying around the farm, and again I was fascinated.

I realize that most people would be most interested in just converting scrap wood to gas, but if someone wanted to devote a section of woodlot to wood gas production, do some woods perform better than others? Or would fast growing trees be a more important consideration?

John
4 years ago
As a result of the 2007-08 financial fiasco that wreaked havoc on the world economy, many Americans still have similar fears to yours. And considering that the massive banking institutions central to the collapse continue their financial shenanigans, and the agencies chartered to oversee them continue to look the other way, we should be both cautious and concerned. But being fearful to the point of paralysis doesn't get anyone anywhere. Life goes on. Though the Fed and the Treasury are far from blameless in allowing the nonsense that led up to the collapse to occur, the fact remains that they did step in and prevent the outcome from being much worse. We may not be happy about the bailouts, but in hindsight, without them taking action as they did, the result likely would have been worse than the Great Depression. The bottom line is that a precedent has been set and given similar circumstances, it is likely that steps will be taken to prevent total collapse. Saving your money in FDIC insured deposits is probably the safest way to hang on to your cash, and I believe the chance of an event occurring prior to early 2016 that would wipe out the value of those savings is minimal.
4 years ago