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Bert de Weert

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since Jun 17, 2013
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Recent posts by Bert de Weert

The best preservative is to use no preservative in my opinion, but to use the right timber for the job. Poplar and ash will rot away quickly in contact with the ground. Try using Black locust/ honey locust or sweet chestnut. Oak and chestnut ( the heartwood) will last about 40 years, even in contact with the ground. Our sweet chestnut horsepen has a 40 year warranty to it. These timbers can be harvested by yourself most of the time. I have found sheds made from a tropical hardwood called Bankirai /Bangkirai and it just lasts indefinitely. If you use yakisugi on the previously mentioned non- tropical hardwoods they probably will as well.
3 years ago
Hi, I recently restored my grandfathers hatchet and I am not familiar with the maker's mark on it. I wondered if anyone is able to identify it.

Thanks, Bert

for those interested: here is a link to the video.
3 years ago
Hi permies,

I just wanted to share this video on growing potatoes, enjoy.
4 years ago
That seems to work very well too! but I dont think you can make very complicated structures like handles etc.
4 years ago
Thank you all for replying! I think it is indeed true that every farmer had his own recipe, I think it was homemade so it doesn't contain whale or seal as far as i'm concerned.
I will try asking around in the older generation of the family. even though they are uninterested in me and dementing and change the subject as soon as I start about something, they completely live up as soon as I start about the old days. Thank you all again for your feedback, it is well appreciated.

Bert
4 years ago
Hi people,
I am getting into preserving old skills, crafts, tools and also products. So far the introduction.

Here's the deal:

My dad has a small tin that was passed down all the way from my great-great grandfather and his family, who owned a self-sufficient farm at the time that was still possible in The Netherlands.
In the tin is a wax-like, fatty, dark yellow (almost brown) substance with a rather interesting smell, unlike anything I've smelled before. All the generations who owned this tin used it to maintian leather, something
it does extraordinarily well. My dad once told me it was made with lots of stuff, including pig lard and human urine, but he's not sure.

My question now is: Does anybody here at permies recognise, or even have experience or knowledge with using this mysterious substance? I would like to set up a recipe so I can re-make it, because the tin is finally running out. It would be an absolute shame if the recipe were to be lost. I have never had better leather care products.

Your knowledge and experience is well needed and appreciated,

Bert
4 years ago
Hi people,
I wanted to share this spon I carved yesterday.
4 years ago
Don't have any experience with building, but I always feed my horses bamboo in winter, we live in a temperate climate and grass doens't grow below 5 degrees celsius. They Truly Love It!
4 years ago
woodturning without a lathe using a drill press.

4 years ago
Just A project I wanted to share.
4 years ago