• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Permie friendly wood preservative  RSS feed

 
Paul Andrews
Posts: 155
Location: Cornwall UK
7
bike books dog forest garden solar tiny house
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi All
As you may be aware I am building a Geodesic Dome Greenhouse using tanalised timber but this has thrown up a big problem. I am having to mill an angle on all my timber and I am creating a load of toxic sawdust wich I have no idea how to get rid off.

I want to start using a non treated timber and then treat it after all the milling is done.

So I am looking for a permies friendly wood preserver

Any ideas?

Paul
 
Rick English
pollinator
Posts: 265
Location: Central Pennsylvania, USA
36
books dog forest garden hugelkultur toxin-ectomy trees
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It is probably too late for this idea, but there is a new-ish type of lumber that most people haven't heard about. Several companies are now thermotreating/cooking inexpensive species of hardwood lumber, and it offers the same physical properties of the original hardwood, with the rot resistance of pressure treated softwoods, without the addition of chemicals. It also gives the wood a darker color, but you do have to put on some type of uv protector to prevent fading. It costs slightly more than pressure treated lumber, but it seems like it would be perfect for this dome application.

The big application right now is for decking and siding, but some people are also making furniture and even outdoor kitchens out of it. It is not commonly available everywhere, but it is started to gain traction in the U.S.

Full disclosure - I don't work for this company, but I did work on their website:
http://www.bingamanlumber.com/hardwood-products/thermo-treatment/page.aspx?id=1366
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5955
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
377
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Paul, I've updated the 'similar threads' at the bottom of this page....maybe some of it would apply to what you are doing. good luck!
 
Bill Bradbury
pollinator
Posts: 684
Location: Richmond, Utah
32
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Paul,

I agree, milling that stuff is a horrible job!

We use this Yakisugi Charring Wood quite a bit in our restoration work. The charring can help to remove toxic finishes from the wood as well.

I would run a hand plane over the tanalized wood until the wood itself starts to show and then char lightly. This should get most of the nasties out, without building too much charcoal on the outside.

All Blessings,
Bill
 
Jay C. White Cloud
Posts: 2413
46
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I agree with Bill, that Yakisugi (grilled cedar) 焼き杉 and natural species resistant to rot, plus other traditional methods are going to be the primary focus for natural/traditional builders for the near future, and perhaps beyond. There are some on the horizon with great potential. Something I have been following and researching for about 3 years now is called Acetylated wood.

Of everything I have my "ear on" in the "green" or "environmentally safe" world of R&D for "treated lumber" this one appears to be really the one grabbing attention...and big investors. I have seen several samples and examples of the work and it is quite impressive. Of the 15 or so glass and wood skyscraper slated to start this year, several may have this type of wood, especially for the foundations.

Regards,

j
 
Bert de Weert
Posts: 64
11
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The best preservative is to use no preservative in my opinion, but to use the right timber for the job. Poplar and ash will rot away quickly in contact with the ground. Try using black locust/ honey locust or sweet chestnut. Oak and chestnut ( the heartwood) will last about 40 years, even in contact with the ground. Our sweet chestnut horsepen has a 40 year warranty to it. These timbers can be harvested by yourself most of the time. I have found sheds made from a tropical hardwood called Bankirai /Bangkirai and it just lasts indefinitely. If you use yakisugi on the previously mentioned non- tropical hardwoods they probably will as well.
 
Chadwick Holmes
Posts: 618
Location: Volant, PA
27
forest garden fungi goat trees wofati woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Raw linseed oil ( flaxseed oil) is gold I use it as my only wood finish.
 
Do you pee on your compost? Does this tiny ad?
Ernie and Erica Wisner's Rocket Mass Heater Everything Combo
https://permies.com/t/40993/digital-market/digital-market/Ernie-Erica-Wisner-Rocket-Mass
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!