Janet Williams

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since Jul 27, 2013
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Recent posts by Janet Williams

I've been reading up on Ginseng as a forest cash crop. (slow crop...large monetary yields?) Anyone here have any experience with this?
6 years ago
IMO, as a life long owner of horses, this indulgence is worth the work. Life needs to be enjoyed. We enjoy a slow day spent on the wagon or in the saddle as time to appreciate life and all that nature has to offer. It's also great for that "alone" time with someone special. A good horse will reward you in many ways, and the manure is not only good for growing plants. We have great worm beds because of that contribution!
If the need arises, our wagon horse will plow the garden.
6 years ago

Galadriel Freden wrote:Joel, my small family of 3 are looking at the same thing you are, with inspiration from Geoff Lawton's "greening the desert" project in Jordan. My parents live in Southern Utah, and we're looking to sell up here (currently in the UK) and move down, either close to them at 6000 ft elevation, or a bit further south near St George at 2000 ft--quite a difference in plant hardiness zones, but we're looking at issues like average rainfall, water rights, and the cost of land for both areas. It seems like there's some extremely cheap land around there!

Our initial budgeting is similar to yours, though we plan on from $10k-$20k for the land, looking at 5-20 acres; and our first priority would be earthworks and planting of trees and perennials; following that in order of importance--and depending on funds--would be livestock and housing for them and us, underground rainwater catchment containers, solar panels. and a well. We're planning on an Oehler structure for our own housing, but will probably be living in an RV and/or with parents until it's built. Shelter for livestock will either be strawbale or earthbag structures--we're definitely looking at poultry and a few pigs to begin with, but cattle and sheep are also a possibility in the long run.

I don't know what water rights laws are in NM, but in Utah they seem to be complicated, so if we do end up in Southern Utah, this may have implications for our permaculture plans. I think of all considerations, ownership of water rights is probably going to be the deal breaker for any property we consider--I'm sure you've already looked into the NM laws.

Though I've never lived in that area, I love the desert (lived in Eastern Utah for four years) and with my newbie permaculture vision, I think we can make it grow and thrive, and support those 5000 rabbits--though I'm hoping it's turkeys instead, as I prefer a nice turkey soup over a rabbit stew



I like your idea's. If I may suggest, a beagle dog or two, will help in the control of rabbits. And/or can the rabbit meat to feed the beagles..
Marcos, we looked into the evaporative cooling, and came to the same conclusion. It has to be very low humidity to be effective. However, my Husband did read your report, and says he understands the concept. Whether or not it will be implemented, remains to be seen. There are many unfinished projects around here! Being in the construction field, we try to be efficient homeowners, but there is always something to learn.
I've always dreamed of adobe style walls! Not common here, but I lived in New Mexico for 4 years, and know how effective those thick walls are. Easy to cool and heat. Anyhow, thanks for your response.
7 years ago
Thanks guys. We live in Mississippi, so its very hot and humid. Sounds like the Earth Tubes would not be a good option. And we're not off grid, but I'm going to explore the evaporative cooling, and let my Hubbie read about this other system.
7 years ago
What's even more amazing, is that boy is smiling while peeling a log! I want one!! BTW, I grew up in Ohio, little farming communities along Lake Erie. I loved the winters. Here, in Mississippi, its colder in winter because it's a wet cold. No fun! No snow either.
Not sure what a Biological Engineer does, but, your gonna have one if you need one I guess!
7 years ago
Now that's what I call ART!! Very cool.
7 years ago
Hi Glenn. I have a friend in the Missoula area. Hard Farm working girl. She told me several years ago, that the neighbors there had to share an irragating system, to water thier fields for the grazing horses and cows, etc. Always seemed like a tough way to go to me. Your place is beautiful. I know the winters are hard there, so good luck, and keep us posted on how things are going for you and your family.
BTW, Notre Dame @ 16 yrs. old??? That's amazing!! You must be so proud of your son! What field of study is he interested in?
7 years ago
We are interested in alternative cooling systems as well. Your study is of interest, although way out of my league of understanding. (Hubbie would understand more than I would). A few years ago, I found an interesting cooling idea that does use duct work, but, is very simple in that, you just bury 4" PVC, about 6' deep, and about 100' to 150' long. I think it was called "Earth Tubes". We are thinking of implementing this idea. I was about to post about this when I came across your post. Are you familiar with "Earth Tubes"?
7 years ago
We have one. It was a propane tank for heat. We own it, and havent used propane for 5 years. We have an indoor wood burning heater. My Hubbie is going to use his torch, and cut it in half, and make a large outdoor wood burning heater, that will also heat our water.
7 years ago