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Susan Bradley Skov

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since Sep 11, 2013
Denmark (USDA Zone 7, Koppen Cfb temperate oceanic)
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Recent posts by Susan Bradley Skov

Peter Liv wrote:i just watched Jerome Osentowski's greenhouse.  It was a very good introduction to a earth sheltered greenhouse, going over basic features.  But it was a basic talk.  If I purchased this Mother Earth package, would I get complete access to Jerome's book?  Or should I just purchase his book directly?


Both of Osentowski's presentations are pretty basic, and the possibility lifetime access contains for a download-able video/PDF/mp3 is just the presentation, itself. If you want to go in-depth, buy the book. That goes for the other presentations as well, except for Geoff's, because he has a lot of freely accessible stuff online. I bookmarked quite a few of the sites under the presenters' pictures. I think that's a good way to find out more about things one finds interesting.
I really like being able to go back and see some things I skipped the first time around, not to mention the access I've gotten to the 2016 Home Grown Food Summit.
1 year ago
Brunkål! ("brown cabbage"), a favorite Christmas dish in Denmark, along with potatoes treated in the same way
1 year ago
The videos available with paid lifetime access (and early access) are not teasers. I have participated in a similar summit recently, with some of the same promoters, where I opted for lifetime access, and I can still see the full videos online through a members' portal.
1 year ago
About the broken glass and sharp edges - My son played strong man in the circus his gradeschool put on every year. One of his tricks was to strip to the waist, lie down on broken glass and let one of the smaller kids stand on his chest. He carefully explained the trick to his half hysterical mother: They boiled the broken glass pieces, so the edges wouldn't cut him, but the pieces still looked like raw broken glass. Might be easier and probably more effective than a cement mixer?
1 year ago
I know, it's like a bare earth policy aimed at future generations, with no other rational than "Start from scatch and fix things piecemeal afterwards, if we have to." Unfortunately, this process also seems to be internationally universal, unless someone shouts really loud and just keeps on shouting.
3 years ago
Oh my, and I thought I didn't really have room for fruit trees. Well, they're going in now! Thank you for the inspiration - and the kid looks like a sure and certain good grower.
3 years ago
Now that's turning a problem into a solution!
3 years ago
A better posibility is Rhamnus cathartica (common buckthorn), which is shade tolerant and has a harder, denser wood.
Wikipedia: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhamnus_cathartica#In_North_America
This sounds like really difficult stuff to get rid of, but one effective solution suggested was a propane weed torch in spring or early summer, before other plants have sprouted.
Both plants are extremely purgative, so goats aren't a good idea.
3 years ago
The confusion comes from the common name 'buckthorn', as both Hippophae rhamnoides (sea-buckthorn) and Rhamnus frangula (alder buckthorn) are commonly referred to as 'buckthorn'. From the OP's description of the habitat in which the plant is growing, it is almost certainly Rhamnus frangula. One really good way to distinguish Rhamnus frangula from other 'buckthorns' is that it does not have thorns.
Wikipedia has some good information http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frangula_alnus#Taxonomy_and_naming
Since lack of light will hinder the growth of the alder buckthorn, it might be a good idea to remove it by hand in small areas, which can be protected from the deer until the canopy closes better, or plant things you want, that can shade out the alder buckthorn, with protection, until they get big enough to take some deer grazing.
3 years ago
It's quite common, here where I live, to have a bottle of calcium chloride solution (calcium chloride, water and lactic acid) in the cupboard to add to spinach and rhubarb dishes. One uses 2 tsp. per kilo, either while cooking or afterwards, in order to neutralize the oxalic acid. I don't remember something like that being generally available when I lived in the US, but it might be worth checking. It doesn't seem to be used for raw greens, however. I don't know if it would have the same effect without heat.
3 years ago