Kathleen Sanderson

pollinator
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since Feb 28, 2009
Green County, Kentucky
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Recent posts by Kathleen Sanderson

Bethany Dutch wrote:I also don't really view mortgage debt automatically as a bad thing.

I have a mortgage on my land. If I didn't have my land, I wouldn't have been able to build my home (which I built with cash/sweat equity). If I didn't have that mortgage, I'd probably still be renting and throwing money away every month.

While I do agree that it is important to do everything you can to pay off a mortgage asap, sometimes taking on a mortgage is the only way to get out of the renting trap. I'd much rather be paying monthly for a mortgage than monthly rent. Now having said that, it is my intent to use my land as a way to give my kids a way to have a home w/o a mortgage, but I think sometimes leveraging a mortgage is probably the quickest path to actually being debt free.

If I hadn't been able to build my house with cash, I would still be renting and probably would still have consumer debt. Having built my home with cash has allowed me to pay off all my consumer debt... but I had to get that mortgage on the land to get to that point.



There is a time and place for a mortgage.  If I hadn't taken on a mortgage when I bought the last house we lived in, we would have had to live in that old 5th wheel travel trailer with no plumbing inside it for another three years, by my calculations.  (I had bought a couple of cheap lots near my mother's place, where we were living, but they needed a well and a septic system before I could even start building.)  All things considered, the mortgage was a good decision, but I'm really glad that I was able to pay it off quickly.

I think my main advice is that most people will need to seriously down-scale their expectations of the kind of house they can afford, and need to have in order to be comfortable, in order to pay a mortgage off quickly.  Often cheap houses need a lot of work, so a combination of skills, some money for materials, and time are needed.  But there's an element of keeping up with the Jones's in most of us that makes us unwilling to live in anything we -- or others -- might consider 'substandard.'  It helps to be able to lose that notion.

Kathleen
1 week ago

Stacy Witscher wrote:Jackie - In my experience, not all bills are voluntary. For example, around here if an ambulance is used to transport you, you are legally reasonable for the bill regardless of whether or not you chose to take it. But that aside, I find things way more complicated than you, and rarely attach morality or ethics to payments to corporations. It's extremely freeing.



While I'm not big on corporations (although many are actually small businesses that had to incorporate), incurring a bill -- a debt -- and then refusing to pay it is actually stealing.  And even the big corporations have many people working for them who need their paychecks, and they sell a product which can see the price go up to other buyers if too many people refuse to pay their bills/debts.  So there is more to the morality question than perhaps you are considering.

Kathleen
1 week ago
I've got almost 8,000 words on mine (but I started a few hours early, the evening before).  Will probably not get as much done until Tuesday because one of my daughters is coming for a short visit.  But it's coming along pretty well.

Kathleen
1 week ago
I've got some old hay, and plan to mulch around my Brown Turkey with that.  We've only had one light frost here so far.  This is our first winter in Kentucky, so I'm not really sure how cold it can get here.  I've been looking, and finding average low temperatures, but that's not telling me the extreme lows.  Like, where we lived in Eastern Oregon before we moved here, the average lows are in the teens, but it can get down to twenty or thirty degrees below zero F -- and does so fairly frequently.

2 weeks ago
I'm in zone 6b, so near the northern limits to grow figs outdoors, I think.
2 weeks ago
I'm wondering if I chose the best location for my fig tree -- it's in a corner of the house that is open to the south and the east.  There is a similar corner open to the south and the west, but it gets a lot more shade (the house is shaded on the south and west sides by several large black locusts).  Alternatively, I could move it to the south side of one of the barns as they both have good south-facing walls with no shade.  (It would be easy enough to move the little tree since I only planted it a few days ago).  Or I can move starts off of it to those locations later -- it sounds like we may not have any trouble keeping it small and may need more plants.

2 weeks ago

Lucrecia Anderson wrote:

Kathleen Sanderson wrote:Someone up there seems to think that there is nothing morally wrong with murder in order to get food if you are starving...thought I might address that a little bit. 

There are times when it is morally right to kill another human being:  if you are fighting in a war, you have to kill your enemies or they will kill you (this generally only pertains to soldiers but under some circumstances civilians can get caught up in the fighting).  And if you or yours are being attacked, you have a moral obligation -- not just a right, but an obligation -- to protect them with all force necessary to neutralize the threat. 

Other than those particular situations, it is *never* morally correct to commit murder.  If you failed to be prepared or to develop skills, or to overcome laziness, and you failed to make sure that you could feed yourself and your family/tribe, that is on you.  The fellow who did prepare or develop skills, and who has a good work ethic, has no moral obligation to die in order for his provisions to feed you.  He does have a moral obligation to be armed so he can fight off the parasites who have that mind set.

There, that's my two cents on that subject!

Kathleen



If someone thinks murdering your neighbors so you can steal their stuff is "moral" then I don't think they have a good understanding of the word. However you can be sure LOTS of people will find reasons to "justify" robbing and even killing their neighbors.

Having said that, in a serious long term shtf situation the standards for justifiable homicide will drastically change (unless you are in Texas, then it stays about the same).  Theft and the like will probably be a capital offense simply because a) stealing someone's food/supplies can be the same as killing them and b) no one will have the time/energy/resources to incarcerate criminals.



I agree with what you said, especially that last bit that I bolded.  It will be like in the Old West when they hung horse thieves, because stealing a man's horse and leaving him on foot was for all practical purposes murder.

Kathleen
2 weeks ago
Thanks -- of course, I have no idea which one this is! 

How long does it usually take to see fruit from newly planted trees?

And how do I keep it small?  I don't want it to turn into a big tree (I suppose it's likely to freeze to the ground at least some winters here, anyway).

Kathleen
2 weeks ago
I just planted a Brown Turkey fig here in South-central KY about a week ago.  It was sold at the local Tractor Supply store, so I'm hoping it will do well in this climate.  Can the fruit be used to make dried figs that will look and taste similar to the dried figs at the grocery store, or are those a different kind?

Kathleen
2 weeks ago
Someone up there seems to think that there is nothing morally wrong with murder in order to get food if you are starving...thought I might address that a little bit. 

There are times when it is morally right to kill another human being:  if you are fighting in a war, you have to kill your enemies or they will kill you (this generally only pertains to soldiers but under some circumstances civilians can get caught up in the fighting).  And if you or yours are being attacked, you have a moral obligation -- not just a right, but an obligation -- to protect them with all force necessary to neutralize the threat. 

Other than those particular situations, it is *never* morally correct to commit murder.  If you failed to be prepared or to develop skills, or to overcome laziness, and you failed to make sure that you could feed yourself and your family/tribe, that is on you.  The fellow who did prepare or develop skills, and who has a good work ethic, has no moral obligation to die in order for his provisions to feed you.  He does have a moral obligation to be armed so he can fight off the parasites who have that mind set.

There, that's my two cents on that subject!

Kathleen

2 weeks ago