Kathleen Sanderson

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since Feb 28, 2009
Green County, Kentucky
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Recent posts by Kathleen Sanderson

I'm going to keep an eye on this thread, because I have a steel stove that will be used in the living room (a very small one -- it's a Vermont Castings Aspen, the smallest one they make, I think).  My plan is to encase the stove with bricks underneath and on three sides, leaving only the front and top with the steel exposed to the room.  This will be partly for safety and partly for heat storage.  I'm interested in whether or not it proves safe to attach a bell to a standard wood stove, though.  If it was safe, I do have room to do that. 

3 weeks ago
See, those apples that don't break bud early are what I'm looking for.
2 months ago
Will pomegranates grow in Kentucky?  (I suspect not.)  But mulberries will, and I was already planning on planting some of those around the outside of the goat pasture.

2 months ago
We've been at our new place in KY for almost a month and a half; picked up eight Icelandic hens and five roosters plus a bunch of hatching eggs from a breeder in TN shortly after we got here.  They don't quite meet all of my criteria (a bit small to be good meat birds), but they do meet most of what I wanted, and are pretty cute besides!  The eight hens are giving us from six to eight eggs a day (usually seven eggs/day, but of course it's spring, the peak laying season).  I've hatched out the eggs from the breeder, traded some of the chicks to a friend here, and have the incubator full of eggs from the hens I brought home (and they are still giving us plenty to eat).  They are doing really well here; the roosters are all running with the hens (I will eventually separate breeding pens, but have too much to do right now to build those) and are all getting along and watching over the hens with only minor squabbles.  I think that as long as big meat birds aren't your priority, these guys are great homestead chickens.

Kathleen
2 months ago
There are some people raising Kinder goats and getting good milk production without feeding much if any grain (a tiny bit on the milking stand to get them to stand still, possibly).  Kinders ancestry is half Pygmy and half Nubian; they are a dual-purpose breed used for both meat and milk.  I've had them before but had to feed them as we only had one acre at the time.  I'm hoping that here they'll have enough forage much of the year to not need supplements. 
Thanks -- that might be easier to find than looking for hard to get bud-break.  Terminology is everything (and I know I've seen chill-hour lists).

2 months ago
Does anyone know of a list of fruit varieties that don't break their buds easily?  The issue is warm spells mid-winter, followed by freezing weather, in addition to the usual late-spring frost concerns.

2 months ago
Thanks, Glenn, that sounds like good advice, and about what I was thinking as far as doubling joists and so on.  The house is located in south-central Kentucky, the soil is good silt-loam but probably has a little clay in it.  The location of the stove will be central in the house, next to the existing brick chimney, which I plan to use after it's been checked out and, if necessary, repaired.  (The house was built in the 1920's, I think; the chimney hasn't been used in a long time).  The ground under the interior part of the house stays quite dry for the most part, and in any case I doubt that foundations there need to be more than eighteen inches or two feet into the ground.  I've got to run or we'll be late for an appointment, but will check back here later.

Kathleen
3 months ago
We will be moving to Kentucky and our 'new' little old farmhouse at the end of this week, and heating the place is on my mind.  I've got the plans for both Walker kitchen stoves and plan to build one of them in the kitchen of the 'new' house, with a heated bench extending into the living room.  I think I will have to cut a hole in the floor and build a foundation for the stove and bench on the ground, shoring up the floor joists around the hole, and supporting them somehow.  The house is on a crawlspace; there's probably only a couple of feet from the ground to the underside of the floor joists.  Has anyone else done this?  Any tips or advice on how best to do it?

Kathleen
3 months ago

Jese Anderson wrote:More "bad" about Black Locust:

Yes, it's great for BTU's (one of the best) but I never burn it.  When I decide to or have to take out some black locust on my property the go to fence posts.  Why fence posts?  Well that's all will let my chainsaw give to a black locust.  A single tree will completely ruin a chain on a chainsaw. I can't say I've ever sawed a good dry one and not seen sparks fly like hitting a piece of metal.

Great fence posts 50-75 years easy.



That's actually good to know, because the two barns on my new property were built with black locust poles, and the fence has a lot of black locust posts in it. 

Kathleen
4 months ago