Jeremy martin

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since Apr 05, 2014
I have been interested in Permaculture for years now and took Geoff Lawtons 2013 Online PDC. I live in Northern New Mexico and am saving up for land of my own.
Dixon, New Mexico Zone 6a
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Recent posts by Jeremy martin

Hello Everyone

I just got a great description of Gabion Baskets also some contexts Gabion Baskets would be appropriate in this came from a discussion in the Watershed Restoration Group on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/groups/384391798391982/ from Jan-Willem Jansens

Here it is

Jan-Willem Jansens Hi Jeremiah, Let me try to add my thoughts to this also, in an attempt to participate a bit more in the conversations. I have hardly ever chosen to work with gabions, but I see where they have their place. Water makes 3-D movements with oscillations up and down (waves) and sideways (meanders); the steeper the slope the stronger the vertical oscillation and the weaker the horizontal ones. As a result, flatter flows tend to meander more and steeper flows tend to cascade more. As far as I've traced it back, check dams, and later, the engineered form, gabions, were developed for steep mountain streams in the alps that typically have a cascading nature. Like with forestry techniques, these stream management techniques were replicated for US conditions in the 19th century. Unfortunately, they were promulgated outside their original ecological purpose conditions, such as in flat, sandy streams (including in the Sahara!), where they often failed due to the stream's meandering, rather than cascading movement. In such conditions, they tend to fill in behind them, get flanked, or undermined due to piping in the sandy bottoms. I have also seen that they can be very lasting in sandy bottom streams, to such an extent that they raise the grade so well that they cause dramatic meandering upstream due to a stream that becomes too flat and drops too much coarse sediment. But that's a design error rather than an error of the selection of the gabion as a technique. However, if used in cascading rather than meandering stream, and if well keyed-in, and designed with a spill way (notch in the dam) gabions may work well, especially where a large, strong structure us needed. They also work well in retaining walls, coffer dam constructions, and revetments, if well designed and properly installed, and if one is not put off by their non-naturalistic look. [JWJ]

Hope this gives everyone a better understanding of Gabion Baskets

cheers
Jeremiah
I am going to get some Goats and coppice/ pollard the elm's, if you really need to kill them though you cut it down leaving a nice tall stump then you drill holes and pour in 20% vinegar and rock salt, that finishes em off. And you may have to repeat, also like some said if you keep the leaves off it for a period of time about three years the tree will not be able to make any starch and it willl die http://maestro-gro.com/vinegar20acidity.aspx
3 years ago
I have a link to a worm system and was wondering if this is similar to the one Roberto was talking about http://permaculturenews.org/2013/09/18/grey-water-grease-trap-pri-maungaraeeda-sunshine-coast-australia/
4 years ago
Enjoying the thread, I am researching how to build a grey water system for 20,000 gallons a month at peak usage. It will be designed for a cold temperate climate 5a-5b and will not include a cold frame/glass house. So the best idea I have seen is the shallow and deep leach fields one for summer and one for winter.
4 years ago
Nice Alan

Here are some good hardy canopy species to get a wind break going and start your micro climate
species

Allot of these can be bought from the state of New Mexico Forestry conservation seedling program
https://wwwapps.emnrd.state.nm.us/fd/treepublic/OrderOnline.aspx

Desert Willow
Hackberry
Sea Buckthorn
Russian Hawthorn
italian alder
thinleaf alder
Rockey Mountain Juniper
Single Seed Juniper
Pinon pinus edulis
New Mexico Elderberry
netleaf hackberry
lacebark elm
Hoptree
Green Ash
Bur Oak
siberian crab apple
prarie crab apple
white mulberry
red mulberry
black birch

cheers
Jeremy
4 years ago
Here is an example

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alnus_incana

The Zuni people use the bark of the tenuifolia subspecies to dye deerskin reddish-brown.

4 years ago
Nice thread,

Fabaceae family has dye potential as well

http://www.theplantlist.org/browse/A/Leguminosae/

anybody here interested in late blooming fruit and nut trees for zones 5b-6a?

cheers
Jeremiah
4 years ago
Here are a couple links the second one is more refined Still doing research for zones 5b - 6a so more to come

http://www.theplantlist.org/browse/A/Leguminosae/

http://tcpermaculture.blogspot.com/2011/05/plants-nitrogen-fixers.html

cheers
Jeremiah
4 years ago
Selection of late leafing, late flowering, laterally fruitful walnut (Juglans regia) types in Turkey


http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01140671.2004.9514313#.U0YbqfldXpU
4 years ago
Late Flowering Trees are important in zone 6 anybody who wants to contribute to a list of some late flowering trees would be much appreciated.

The flowers of Chestnut tree follow the leaves, appearing in late spring or early summer[18] or into July.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chestnut

cheers
Jeremy
4 years ago