• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

List of Legumes by size, climate, and zones.

 
Nathan Hale
Posts: 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I love geoff lawton's DVDs, but one thing that I always wish I had when I watch them is a list of legumes that work in certain climates. It would be awesome to have a list of plants, shrubs, trees and what zones and climates they would work in along with common and scientific names.

Anyone know of a resource for this info? In a list form would be even better! (like this one for companion plants: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_companion_plants)
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Pie
Posts: 8975
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
132
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Personally I like the Plants for a Future database.  http://www.pfaf.org/

I don't know of any other listing like it, or better than it, presently.
 
                    
Posts: 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Dogwoods and Mimosa trees are legumes; however, I'm not sure how they do with coppicing in regards to food forests.
 
Alex Brands
Posts: 55
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Dogwood is not a legume.....perhaps you are thinking of redbud?

Mimosa has a reputation for being hard to get rid of because it grows back after being cut down, so I think it would coppice well.

Alex
 
                    
Posts: 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Not a big deal but every source I come across says dogwoods are a legume, even my Edible Forest Gardens books.  I'll look through my notes on my design and see if I can come up with any others in this category.
 
John Polk
master steward
Pie
Posts: 8016
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
269
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I would be leary of your reference sources.

Dogwoods are in the Cornaceae family.
Legumes are in the Fabaceae family.
 
rose macaskie
Posts: 2134
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
   What about a list here then? I have just brought some small broom plants brooms are of the leguminouse family, I am stepping up my act on the legume plants front, I am trying to put my money where my mouth goes and plant lot of leguminouse trees and bushes. I have looked at their roots and they have small nodules on them.
    I looked up legume trees, googled them and it seems they are more likely to have nodules on their roots if they are in poor soil, if they are in a nitrogen rich soil they have less nodules.

   Locust trees and that is a north american tree are leguminouse nitrogen fixing trees. The wood can be cancerigenic i read in one place, so dont have a locust tree saw mill but i dont suppose occasional contact matters. It  is useful for handles if you dont mind it, according to some, being a bit cancerigenic.
    The cercis siliquastrum or judas tree, some say it has that name because it came from judea, that is after coming from further east. It  is also called by some, the tree of love, it has heart shaped leaves and called the buddha tree, is a tree of the legume family. It is happy with a mediteranean climate, that is a bit of cold and heat and drought. The one I have bought had nitrogen fixing nodules on it roots.

  Prosopis  trees, mesquite trees are part of this family are trees that do for drier places but are not cold hardy i imagine, certainly mimosas aren't, which are the other desert leguminouse tree.
 real acacias mimosas that are trees that grow on the borders of deserts are another legume family tree. Some of these desert legume trees maybe all of them, i have just looked up acacias and some can kill herbivores. I have not studied all of them, are good forage plants and the beans are food for humans.The prosopis cineria the prosopis of arabia and india is a forage tree with eatable beans too.
Many have very sweet edible beans for instance the algarrobo of Spain and the mequite tree of Arizona whose flour, mixed with wheat flour Brad Lancaster uses for pancakes as you will know if you whatch Brad Lancasters video on premaculture on you tube.  
  One reason that legume trees are good forage plants is that proteins are molecules that include a atom or two of nitrogen  so legume trees  are usefull to animals that have to grow plenty of muscle as leguminous tress fabeaceas,with their nitrogen fixing nodules have plenty of nitrogen in them.
    About freezing sensitive trees, I have seen horticultural fleece in the nearest garden shop to me sold to wrap round lemon trees, it lets in the light and air but protects from the cold, it will help my mimosas to get climatised now i have got myself to plant legume trees seriously and bought two mimosas.
   There are several legume family bushes that i have not mentioned here because i dont know the names of the ones i can think of and there must be lots of nitrogen fixign plants I dont know of, I am not a great expert on nitrogen fixing trees and bushes.

 None legume nitrogen fixing trees that i know of, the eleagnus, the variety fruticans is the one Geof Lawson talks about in greening the desert that he calls guomi which is its name, which is the eleagnus frutican that Ken Fern also talks about because grown as a hedge it makes a good wind break. It does not mind winds, he has a place in Cornwall the South of England, so not too cold but windy being by the sea and he talks of it because it has fruit in April, he is the big expert on edible plants,he is a cute ex-bus driver turned super expert on edible and medicainal plants.
    The fruit doesn't taste very exciting, sweet and alright but they are meant to be very good for you and are the eariiest thing fruiting, at least in Cornwall. Maybe how alright they taste depends on the type of eleagnus, people go wild about the fruit of the guomi, i have just chequed up on it, googled it.
   They can make a small tree and must be pretty as such as the underside of their leaves are nearly white, pale creamy colored and a bit shiny, I would like to look up into one. Their flower is tiny maybe this depends on variety too but makes everything round it smell of a flower shop. I  have brought one and seen nitrogen fixing nodules on its roots. Some say it goes rogue and gets all over the place.  
 
 The ceanothus is another none legume nitrogen fixer but is a bush not a tree and a californian plant. I have seen nitrogen fixing nodules on its, roots they look like small bread crumbs. I do have  photo of them that I have hung on a different bit of these forums.  
and, now i have to double cheque on these plant names, i am just terrible on names and spelling. agri rose macaskie madrid.


 
 
Denise Lehtinen
Posts: 102
Location: Tampa, Florida zone 9A
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The two nitrogen-fixers I know of for Florida are Sunshine Mimosa and Perennial Peanut.  Both are perennial and low-growing like clover.
 
andrew curr
Posts: 288
Location: Deepwater northern New South wales Australia
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Alex Brands wrote:Dogwood is not a legume.....perhaps you are thinking of redbud?

Mimosa has a reputation for being hard to get rid of because it grows back after being cut down, so I think it would coppice well.

Alex
we have an orange flowering acacia here known as dogwood
 
Paulo Bessa
pollinator
Posts: 352
Location: Portugal (zone 9) and Iceland (zone 5)
12
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Top my knowledge:

And only edible species, several of which I have started to experiment with:

COLD CLIMATE (like zone 5 to 7):
TREE Honey locust
SHRUB Siberian pea shrub, Elaeagnus
VINE Groundnut apios americana

TEMPERATE CLIMATE (like zone 8 or 9):
TREE Illinois bunderflower, Mesquite and Carob (in dry and warmer climates)
SHRUB: Elaeagnus
VINE: Runner beans (under mulch), Thicket bean, Hog peanut

TROPICAL, almost no frosts (zone 10)
TREE: Chachafruto (Erythrina), Tahitian Chestnut (nuts)
SHRUB Pigeon pea, Chipilin (leaves)
VINE Winged bean, Lima Beans, Jícama

Some other suggestion?
 
Kay Gee
Posts: 17
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I saw broom mentioned above, personally i would strongly recommend against it as it has a habit of taking over disturbed open areas. the amount of seeds produced on one plants is ridiculous. or at least hack it down before the pods develop.

Here are some suggestions for the more tropical regions:

Cover crops:
Desmanthus species (good cold weather ones too)
Mucuna pruriens (velvet bean)
Vigna species (beans)


Tree/shrubs
Inga species (ice cream beans) - fruit
Tamarindus incida (Tamarind) - fruit/veggie
Acacia species (large/slowish but good for wood/aesthetics/lanscaping etc)
Cassia species - veggies, seeds, fruit
Ceratonia siliqua (carob)


these 2 might be of use in colder areas, but i have not grown them
Prosopis glandulosa
Gleditsia triacanthos (colder species)


if you have a lot of open space just waiting for weed colonization, you could always grow beans, peas, clovers etc as a cover crop to just allow the soil to be covered and then you can mulch/compost the stuff whenever you feel like. some beans can be weedy though, so mowing them down before seeds set would be a good idea.


there are a lot of weedy Fabaceae plants like broom mentioned above. careful what you plant.
 
Jeremy martin
Posts: 21
Location: Dixon, New Mexico Zone 6a
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I like this post and want to open up the discussion again. I am researching legume and nitrogen fixing species that double as fodder. I will add what I find in another post.

cheers
Jeremy
 
Jeremy martin
Posts: 21
Location: Dixon, New Mexico Zone 6a
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Here are a couple links the second one is more refined Still doing research for zones 5b - 6a so more to come

http://www.theplantlist.org/browse/A/Leguminosae/

http://tcpermaculture.blogspot.com/2011/05/plants-nitrogen-fixers.html

cheers
Jeremiah
 
Nadine McKenzie
Posts: 13
Location: Old Fort, North Carolina, USA. Sandy Loam.
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My personal favorite is the black locust.  The flowers are edible and are a favorite of bees.  Other parts are toxic.

Method of reproduction - cut a thin branch and stick in the ground.

Wood - very high BTU so a branch will burn very well - great coppice tree and will grow back what has been cut.  So while it doesn't produce fruit that's edible, it has other value.
 
Rebecca Norman
gardener
Pie
Posts: 1032
Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
89
food preservation greening the desert solar trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Nadine McKenzie wrote:Black Locust... Method of reproduction - cut a thin branch and stick in the ground... -- great coppice tree and will grow back what has been cut.


Have you actually propagated black locust by cuttings? We didn't think it was possible, so we purchased lots of seedlings, 2 - 3 feet tall. They all took root very easily. Also, have you ever coppiced it? I googled and found a few pictures of coppiced or pollarded Robinia. I'd like to pollard it here (means coppicing up above head height).
 
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic