Nadine McKenzie

+ Follow
since Mar 18, 2015
Old Fort, North Carolina, USA. Sandy Loam.
Apples and Likes
Apples
Total received
0
In last 30 days
0
Total given
0
Likes
Total received
1
Received in last 30 days
0
Total given
0
Given in last 30 days
0
Forums and Threads
Scavenger Hunt
expand First Scavenger Hunt

Recent posts by Nadine McKenzie

I've heard black locust is great for coppicing and has a very high BTU.  It sounds like you're in the South and as you said your heating needs are far less aggressive.  You might consider a passive solar heater/collector.  Plenty of videos on how to construct them and good designs at builditsolar.com.  You could build one over the course or 2 afternoons.  I'm planning on building one of these and having an exterior door to the unit that I can close at night and insulating the unit.  Beats cutting wood I would say.  Another idea is to build a passive solar house and possibly build with hempcrete?  I understand hempcrete has R ratings off the scales.   I'm not sure what the building codes are for your area but I do know that NC has 2 hempcrete built homes.   My last idea is a mass rocket heater.  It has a very efficient burn and uses fewer cords of wood.  I would personally build an outdoor one that heats a greenhouse which is attached to the house.  
2 years ago
Lately,  I've been hooked on Chef's Table Netflix series.  What I love about this series is there are 3 narratives going on.  The chef's narrative, the director's narrative of the chef, and the common struggles and visions that are shared by the chefs which interleaves their stories together.  These 3 narratives creates a rich story and so much depth.  So what does it have to do with Natural Farming, Permaculture, or even Biodynamic farming?

The vision the chefs have is of a magnitude has inspired me and got me to thinking...What is the next quantum leap beyond permaculture, natural farming, or biodynamics? Is permaculture actually creative... Surely, yes with the initial design but once that's implemented, aren't we merely "observers" and "facilitators" and nature is the actual creator?  How do/can we truly create?  



2 years ago
My personal favorite is the Black Locust.  The flowers are edible and are a favorite of bees.  Other parts are toxic.

Method of reproduction - cut a thin branch and stick in the ground.

Wood - very high BTU so a branch will burn very well - great coppice tree and will grow back what has been cut.  So while it doesn't produce fruit that's edible, it has other value.
2 years ago
Honeybees get a remarkable immunity boost from the mycellum of Wine Cap Mushrooms.  This fungi is very easy to grow and can happily dine on cardboard.  I would imaging that anything that is good for honeybees would be equally good for bumblebees.  Paul Stammets has some interesting video on the research behind the Wine Cap mushroom and its immunity boosting properties.  The mushroom is also edible and tastes like potato sauteed in wine.  
Thank you everyone for sharing!  I wonder how nature fabricates the colloidal compost.  Either way, it's very interesting.
2 years ago
Tradd Kotter also talks about myco-remediation using Oyster Mushrooms and King Stopharia.  

Oyster Mushrooms are not picky and can grow on cardboard and coffee grains.  They will digest petrol.

As long as your site doesn't have heavy metals, you can eat the Oyster mushrooms.  Be careful though, mushrooms are heavy metal accumulators so you'd want to be sure there are no heavy metals.
2 years ago

I have to say, I'm impressed with the claims that biodynamic farming uses no pesticides or herbicides in a monoculture setting.  As permaculturist, pests have been my main concern in the food forest.

My question is, anybody out there using biodynamic with success?  How long does it take to start seeing the effects?  Is the food noticeably different tasting?
2 years ago

We think we might have spotted Lion's Mane growing on a standing tree about 3-4 feet above the ground growing on the bark. It was cream colored with maybe a hint of orange hues around the edges. The tentacles were very thin (like the size of needles) and close together. Does anybody know how this mushroom feels to the touch? It felt like fabric when I touched it (which was very surprising).
3 years ago
Dave,
Thanks for sharing your wealth of information! Much appreciated!
3 years ago