Eric Kendall

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since Jul 11, 2014
Emerald, Australia
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Recent posts by Eric Kendall

Hello Paul, Just checked out the preview of your book. Looks great. It just got me thinking about the good old incandescent light bulb. I came up with a theory when I was a kid on how to make them last pretty much indefinitely.  They just need a "soft start". Haven't you noticed that the only time they blow is when first energized. Simple circuitry could be incorporated into the light bezel or the switch for that matter. Let me know your thoughts.
That looks great Michael. Congratulations. Is it fully supported on the floor boards or did you build a sub structure??
Eric
3 years ago
Well I've found quite a bit of info on this process and it looks like it's going to have to be a multi stage operation, but quite achievable for a small scale backyard operation. This looks like the best type of unit for the purpose. http://www.alibaba.com/product-detail/Widely-Used-Many-Types-Stalk-Fuel_688684505.html
It sells for around US$2700.00 but I'm going to see if I can purchase the reduction box, extruder and heating elements independently.
Here is a link to a research paper of the design of such a machine for those interested: http://www.faculty.ait.asia/kumar/rets/briquetting_Manuals/AIT/Design,%20Construction%20and%20Operation%20Details-Biomass%20Briquetti.pdf

A hammer mill is also required to size the raw material. Here is a link to an appropriate unit: http://www.alibaba.com/product-detail/CE-Approved-Mini-Grinding-Gold-Hammer_1708070682.html?spm=a2700.7724838.30.52.1tKEc6
These type of machines are fairly agricultural so it wouldn't take much to make one up at home. Here is a link to a research paper: http://www.iiste.org/Journals/index.php/JETP/article/view/12414
In fact it's worth spending some time on iiste.org. There are some interesting research papers in the back issues.
4 years ago
Thanks again Allen, You've really put a lot of thought analysis into the validity of what we see on You Tube!! Certainly pays to wear the "skeptic" glasses when trawling the net, Especially when it comes to fringe topics like "over unity" and "hydrogen power". (Just to name a couple.)
4 years ago
Thanks Allen, Yes there is some real innovation out there.
4 years ago
Hi guys, we have an abundance of eucalypt leaves and twigs constantly raining down on our property and the usual method of dealing with this is to rake them up and have the council take them away in the green bin. I'm just wondering about other peoples experience in briquetting this kind of biomass. I'm not really interested in the labor intensive methods of hand presses and home made dies, etc.
I was thinking more along the lines of a semi automated, hopper fed screw extrusion system. even an adaptation from the plastic injection molding industry. Has anyone played around with this method?
The other method that I've been looking at utilizes a couple of hydraulic cylinders with screw feed loading. Obviously this system requires a hydraulic power pack and controls which adds significantly to the initial outlay. I'd appreciate any feedback from anyone that has gone down this path. Thanks.
Eric
4 years ago
Hello Jeff, Thanks for the detailed reply and also the links. I've got to learn more about these heat loss calculations. It seems like a good starting point. 250 gallons, that's about a cubic metre and about a ton in weight. Thanks also for those figures on BTUs. I'll have a go at some crude calculations also. Have you seen this thread?
https://permies.com/t/28282/rocket-stoves/rocket-stove-water-heater-designs#221538
There is a lot of discussion on water heating there. I'll post any future develpoments as they come about.
5 years ago
Hello Jeff, I was thinking along those same lines. Have you done any work on this project as yet? My main concern is matching the size of the RMH to the volume of water, especially if the water is to be pumped around the house to hydronic radiators. The volume could soon become quite large.
I put a brief outline of this topic up on Elance to see if there were any thermodynamic engineers out there with this sort of knowledge or background. It did generate some interest with several qualified people wanting to take the project on, but none knew anything about RMH. One guy that had some type of degree in thermodynamics said he would do some research on RMH and get back to me. I'm happy to pay anyone that can help with design criteria.
5 years ago
Hi Guys, I just found this chart at dragon heaters all about heat storage of various materials. Seems water is the top of the list for both volume and mass.
5 years ago