Bonnie Kuhlman

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since Sep 08, 2015
Bonnie likes ...
forest garden chicken food preservation
Zone 7a, Paulden, AZ
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Recent posts by Bonnie Kuhlman

Bryant RedHawk wrote:Citrus growing where it gets to cold for them to live (around 15 degrees f can spell death) can be done but it takes some efforts to keep the chill off.

I have grown lemon and grapefruit trees where the temperatures got down to 0 f occasionally.
The way I saved the trees was with frost blankets and old fashioned smudge pots.

Where I am in Arkansas now, I plan to have some citrus trees in the future but I do plan on building cover supports for them and I'll have to use the hot rock trick from my tribesmen.
I had thought of actually building a special tree green house but I've since changed my mind about building such a permanent structure.
What I'm planning now is four bolt together walls double glazed with plexiglass and using a double layer frost blanket over the top.



Hi Bryant,  

Do you have an update?  Can you elaborate on the smudge pots and hot rocks trick?  

I am trying to find a way to keep my peaches, plums, and apricots warmer through early spring.  We always get a 'fake' spring, the trees bloom, then a hard frost kills the blooms.  In four years, we've only gotten peaches once, and no plums or apricots - all mature trees.  

Bonnie
1 week ago
Congratulations to the winners!!  I hope we will hear from you on which hoe you received and what wonderful things you are doing with it.

Bonnie
2 weeks ago
Zone 7, but I do have a nice little micro-climate on the south side of the house that I think would work.  I've been intrigued by these for a couple years but couldn't find them.  Is the flavor similar to regular collards?

Bonnie
2 weeks ago
Hey Yuri,  So glad to see you here again.  I was just trying to clear the mess in my berry patch and now I think know what I need.  This is so timely.  I want to put down mulch to help control weeds, but there is a lot of tall grass.  I can't cut it without tearing up the berry plants right now, and I can't get to many of the berry plants without cutting it and cleaning out the patch - about 40 yards X 20yards.  It's too much for me to do by hand.  Would the Fokin hoe allow me to clear thick grassy weeds under and between a thick patch of blackberries?  Also, could it be used to remove those that have grown where I don't want them?

Bonnie
2 weeks ago

Chris Kay wrote:

Quinine is something that anyone can make at home and something that is being manufactured each and every day in the form of Tonic Water. Tonic Water has the exact same Quinine that the  drug being used to treat the [Coronu]
Quinine has many uses and applications.  It is analgesic, anesthetic, antiarrhythmic, antibacterial, antimalarial, antimicrobial, antiparasitic, antipyretic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antiviral, astringent, bactericide, cytotoxic, febrifuge, fungicide, insecticide, nervine, stomachic, tonic

If you ever feel a chest cold coming on or just feel like crap make your own Quinine.  It is made out of the peelings of Grapefruits. Take this concoction throughout the day as a tea.  Zinc enhances its effects,

All you need to do to make your very own Quinine:-

Take the rind of 2-3 grapefruits.  
Take the peel only and cover it with water about 3 inches above the peels.
Put a glass lid on your pot if you have one....a metal one is fine if you don't.  
Let it simmer for about 2 hours.
Do not take the lid off of the pot till it cools completely as this will allow the Quinine to escape in the steam.

When I followed this recipe for myself  I immediately recognised the taste of the cooled brew from my youth at the bar of my Grandfather's Ukrainian Club. That should read as: authentic.

My hope is that this simply adds another bitter to your "bow".



I believe quinine is actually made from the bark of the cinchona tree.  Did I miss something?

Bonnie

Edited to correct the quote.
3 weeks ago


Quinine is something that anyone can make at home and something that is being manufactured each and every day in the form of Tonic Water. Tonic Water has the exact same Quinine that the  drug being used to treat the [Coronu]
Quinine has many uses and applications.  It is analgesic, anesthetic, antiarrhythmic, antibacterial, antimalarial, antimicrobial, antiparasitic, antipyretic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antiviral, astringent, bactericide, cytotoxic, febrifuge, fungicide, insecticide, nervine, stomachic, tonic

If you ever feel a chest cold coming on or just feel like crap make your own Quinine.  It is made out of the peelings of Grapefruits. Take this concoction throughout the day as a tea.  Zinc enhances its effects,

All you need to do to make your very own Quinine:-

Take the rind of 2-3 grapefruits.  
Take the peel only and cover it with water about 3 inches above the peels.
Put a glass lid on your pot if you have one....a metal one is fine if you don't.  
Let it simmer for about 2 hours.
Do not take the lid off of the pot till it cools completely as this will allow the Quinine to escape in the steam.

When I followed this recipe for myself  I immediately recognised the taste of the cooled brew from my youth at the bar of my Grandfather's Ukrainian Club. That should read as: authentic.

My hope is that this simply adds another bitter to your "bow".

I believe quinine is actually made from the bark of the cinchona tree.  Did I miss something?

Bonnie
3 weeks ago

Leslie Russell wrote:Thank you!! Yep, me and alcohol had to part ways some years ago, so no bitters for me 🤪



There are ways to make bitters for digestive health without alcohol.  Bitter pastiles come to mind.  Let me know if you're interested and I'll look them up - I have a recipe somewhere.

Bonnie
3 weeks ago
I believe Guido Mase (herbalist) is co-owner of Urban Moonshine brand bitters.  Bitters are also fairly easy to make.  My favorite is a spiced pear bitters recipe that I got from Rosalee de la Foret.  My dd just asked me last night for a recipe for grapefruit bitters, haha.  So, the bitters bug is in the air.  

Bonnie
4 weeks ago

George Waterhouse wrote:Be careful when freezing seeds (good advice from Bonnie and Joseph).  Verify from seed saver sites which seeds can be frozen and which cannot.  Also, viability decreases over time.  If you save your seed by year, you can sprout a few seeds each year from each growing season.  Within a few years you will know how long you can keep your seeds.  As for containers, those dozens of pill bottles you've been throwing away are particularly good for saving seed, and the amber color helps reduce the destructive effects of light.



Great idea, George, to sprout a few seeds each year from each growing season.  I don't take any medications, but a family member saves me lots of those little medicine bottles.  They are very convenient for lots of seeds.