Win a copy of The Edible Ecosystem Solution this week in the Forest Garden forum!

Lisa Rollens

+ Follow
since Jan 21, 2016
Apples and Likes
Apples
Total received
1
In last 30 days
0
Total given
0
Likes
Total received
6
Received in last 30 days
0
Total given
0
Given in last 30 days
0
Forums and Threads
Scavenger Hunt
expand First Scavenger Hunt

Recent posts by Lisa Rollens

CR, are there native elderberries where you live??  There are plenty where I am, in the MO Ozarks.  That will tell you what they like in your area.  I actually dug some cuttings up from the roadside long before there were named varieties (I think!).  We have an Extension Fruit Farm in the area that has been there for over 100 years.  Maybe (guessing) 10 years ago they started doing research on elderberries since they could be a cash crop here in the Ozarks.  One interesting thing in the research was about mowing them down each year...as is done by the road crews.  It runs out that this doesn't cause any problems except delaying fruiting by a couple weeks or so.  That was good news to me because I have some wild bushes that are over 15 feet tall.  No way to harvest those!  Now I just have to remember to bushhog them off in the fall!

Another interesting part of the research was about drooping seed heads.  Some droop, some don't and the ones that don't get eaten by the birds more easily.  I can attest to that.  But, if I cut them down and create shorter plants, then maybe I can put a row cover over the tops when they are ripening.

Good luck with yours!  Lisa
11 months ago
I have sandy soil and also elderberries all over.  I have never watered them, however, I live in the MO Ozarks and sometimes it rains.  Last year and this winter we have had well over our normal rainfall, but the elderberries were around ever since I got here 16 years ago and there have been plenty of drought years.  They do indeed grow in low areas, like along RR tracks.  That might be clayey soil.  My place is sandy enough to look like a beach and the berries are there.   I  have never seen any elderberry plants up on the dry hills.   I've noticed that most of the producing berries grow in full sun.  And when I throw the 'skeletons' out my door I ended up with elders all over the yard!

We are in very different zones, tho.  I am zone 6.  Good luck with your elders!

Lisa
11 months ago
PEARL,

I have not read all of this thread but am getting the idea that you are trying to figure out a waste system you can handle.  There is a book called 'Solviva' written by Anna Edy.  She talks about her composting toilet that men basically refused to use!  So she developed a flushing composting toilet that appeared to work very well.  She actually had numbers of flushes and rolls of TP that were put in it for a year.  The basic idea is an insulated box with a black plastic pipe with slits in it at the very bottom.  That collects the liquid which is then taken underground to fruit trees.  Red worms are in the box, started with suitable bedding for them.  Apparently it worked VERY well.  I'd love to make one.  Worms made everything disappear very quickly.  I don't know how it would work in colder weather, but I am also in south MO (central) and have zillions of redworms that are barely below the surface in compost piles.

Hope this helps!  Where in SW MO are you?  I'd love to meet others who are like me...and it sounds like you are!!!

Lisa
1 year ago
Hi Mary,

I am also looking for a few folks to join me on my farm.  It's 159 beautiful acres and in the Ozarks of MO.  I also am into permaculture and base my decisions on the ethics and principles.  This farm needs the next generation of food producers to come get started now.  Plenty of opportunities here for other farm businesses, too.  If you want to hear more, I'd be glad to talk or email.

Lisa
2 years ago
I agree with John, pretty sure that plant is prairie dock.  We have a  lot of it here in the Ozarks.
4 years ago
Marshmallows make a good bait for raccoons.  Again, put a few outside and the rest in the trap.  I have had raccoon problems in 4 different states.  They thrive around humans and increase their populations.  AT the first sign of raccoons checking the outer rows of corn to see if it is ready, I tied my dogs around the garden, EVERY NIGHT BEFORE SUNSET.  At times with a  big sweet corn patch I've tied 3 out there on different sides of the garden.  It must just be the smell and noise and activity of the dogs that keeps the coons away.  I have never had coon problems after the dogs started their nighttime watch.  I'm sure they aren't very happy with me for doing it, especially during a rainy night, but they come willingly.  Border collies usually.  I don't put the little rat terrier out there.  I'm afraid she could become raccoon food.  Good luck.  I know what you are going thru.  BTW, some say electric fence works, usually at the top and bottom of woven wire or 2X4 fence.
4 years ago
Joseph, possibly you can join me. Let's talk. Here is an email for me: ozarkpcfarm@gmail.com Looking forward to hearing from you. Lisa
4 years ago