Travis Campbell

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since Feb 25, 2019
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Recent posts by Travis Campbell

Has anyone else actually ever grown sainfoin?  And what method did you use to establish it?
2 weeks ago
I'm interested in establishing some Sainfoin for forage this spring on my property.  I was wondering if anyone has heard of or tried to plant it by "frost seeding" it. That is broadcast seeding it in the winter when the ground is going through freezing and thawing cycles to incorporate the seed into the ground. If not what are the best ways to establish it without using a tractor or other large equipment? Thanks.
3 weeks ago
Thanks for the info.  I believe my property is probably too dry for Chufa based on what I've read, but I may be able to grow it around the edges of a pond.

I am familiar with Craig Harper and have bought his book on early succsessional habitats. He is a great resource.

I do have quite a few turkeys in my area so this is some really helpful info thanks.
1 month ago
In this blog post I detail a large selection of plant species that one could plant to create a highly diverse and resilient "food plot" or what I call a Wild Game Meadow to provide great year round forage for game animals. These plant species are mainly geared towards the climate of the northern rocky mountain region with cold wet snowy winters and hot dry summers, however many of these plants would do very well in other regions as well. I'm always open to suggestions so if there is another plant that you think would fit into my list or just a general comment, question or insight let me know. I'm all ears.


https://hunterseden.blogspot.com/2019/12/potential-plant-species-for-my-wild.html?m=1
1 month ago
It sounds like you have a pretty good setup and I really like what you're doing. I am doing something very similar in idaho on my property.

As far as groundcovers I would recommend planting a diverse mix of palatable perennial forbs, in what I would call a "wild game meadow". This will over time be invaded by some undesirable weeds and eventually transition to a forest if left undisturbed, but it will last much longer than a typical food plot. I would recommend looking at both warm and cool season perennials that do well in your area and I would use both natives as well as useful nonnatives.  Some plants that might do well for you are Sainfoin, Alfalfa, American vetch, Chickory, Jerusalem Artichokes,  Goldenrods, Perennial Sowthistle, Bush Clovers, Prairie Clovers, Milkvetches and Asters.

I have a blog that talks about this and some other similar topics if you're Interested. https://hunterseden.blogspot.com/2019/05/forget-food-plots-create-wild-game.html?m=1
1 month ago
I made a post on my blog detailing some of the different methods that I have found through a ton of research on how to convert old pasture made up of nonnative perennial grasses into a more productive ecosystem. My focus is mainly on providing wildlife habitat, but these methods could be used to plant literally anything else that you are trying to grow. I go through some of the pros and cons of different methods including mowing, burning, plowing etc. Check it out if you're interested.

https://hunterseden.blogspot.com/2019/10/managing-nonnative-cool-season.html?m=1
3 months ago
I wrote a post explaining my thoughts on the management of the seed source on a given property and the amazing consequences that can result when you try to design your own ecosystem through the management of seed source by introducing desirable plants and removing undesirable plants. This post is looked at through the lens of managing a property for wild game, but the principal of seed source can be applied to any type of property design where you are actively managing the plant communities for whatever your design goals are.


https://hunterseden.blogspot.com/2019/09/seed-source-is-everything.html?m=1
4 months ago
@ DJ Yeah the glaciers coming out of canada were definitely another form of destruction that I should have mentioned more about but they stopped before covering most of the Pacific Northwest. And you're right much of the midwest was covered in glaciers but they have recovered pretty well and are very diverse in tree species and many are actually still expanding thier range further north into Canada.

@Kali That's pretty cool you're starting your search now. I find the geological and biological history of the area very fascinating. I spend a lot of time down random research rabbit holes on the internet and find out a lot of interesting information.  I'm glad you're enjoying the blog. I have lots of ideas for new posts but not a ton of time to write them. Well keep in touch and maybe we could do a meetup someday.
5 months ago
I have a large area of dry open meadow with very poor clay soil with very low organic matter content. There are plants growing there now, but they are only very hardy invasive species and even they struggle to make it to a foot tall. The dominant plants are sulfer cinquefoil, yellow starthistle, slender plantain and medusahead grass. The climate is a hot dry summer, cold wet winter climate with a little over 25 inches of annual precipitation including some winter snow. My question is what kinds of plants could I plant in bulk to speed up the soil building process.  Ideally I would be looking for plants that would put out a lot of biomass and add organic material fairly quickly and would be able to handle the climate and poor soil. I'm guessing annual and perennial forbs would work best but I would also be open to woody species that would be fast growers under these conditions. I know plants like comfrey are famous for improving the soil but would they be able to handle the poor conditions as well as compete with all the weeds if left on thier own? It is a pretty large area so ideally I'd like to just throw some seed and let it takeover.  Just looking for some ideas. I'm open to any input.
5 months ago
I am curious if anyone has ever planted Oregon white oak from acorns. The past two years I have been randomly spreading acorns around my property on dry open hillsides to try and establish some oak trees. According to my research they are well adapted for dry conditions. I have around 28 inches of annual precipitation and the acorns I use were sourced from an oak forest on the dry east slope of the cascades near Yakima, WA where there is even less annual precipitation, I'm guessing about 20 inches a year. My climate is almost exactly the same as where the seeds were sourced from with very similar associated vegetation such as ponderosa pine and various cool season grasses. I'm thinking my soil may be different though as I am planting in mostly a heavy clay soil. Do you think that would affect them that much? Most of my trees are currently microscopic at 1 and 2 years old. They leaves are very tiny. Even smaller than when they were seedlings. But other than thier small size they seem to be fairly healthy with dark to light green leaves. They are just really puny. I'm almost thinking that they are spending all thier energy on putting down a tap root and maybe in a few years once they have a better root system then they will shoot up but that is just my optimistic theory. Has anyone else ever planted Oregon White Oak acorns in a natural setting with minimal care such as irrigation and got similar results? Will they eventually start to really grow once they are more established?  Or has anybody had this happen with other plant species? Just curious about my puny little trees.
5 months ago