Trevor Newman

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since Jan 28, 2010
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Recent posts by Trevor Newman

I am glad you enjoyed the videos!! I don't see why it would be a problem to freeze the fruits whole. I have experimented with that method this year and I am excited to find out if the seeds retain viability under freezer conditions.
8 years ago
Cannot speak highly enough about Diospyros virginiana(American Persimmon)!!

Recently posted in another thread, but check out our two-part video series about these luscious, low maintainence fruits!

Part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q431DMyK0fI&feature=related

Part 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0NLI-_a9RFc
8 years ago
Thanks for pointing that out John-- they are indeed dioecious. You need a male and female tree for fruit set. However, there are cultivars available that are self fruitful(Meader/Szukis). Some male tree will even produce a female limb and vice versa..very mysterious trees. But generally it is good to plant a lot to ensure that you get some males.

Check out this video we recently shot about the American Persimmon!

Part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q431DMyK0fI

Part 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0NLI-_a9RFc
8 years ago
American Persimmons are very low maintainence and produce bountiful crops of DELICIOUS fruit! Also, if you're looking for disease resistance some cultivars of commons fruits, such as plums and apples, appear to be more disease and insect resistant. 'Freedom' and 'Liberty' apples are two good varieties for that. Try growing native american hybrid plums..such as the 'Bruce' Plum(salicinaXangustifolia). The wild goose plum is a good native plum with nice size fruit, quite hardy and resistant..although it will get black knot.

Asian pears are a good alternative to the European types. They produce well with little care.
8 years ago
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4BJ6V7_FHbM

Tell me what you think.. Lets hear some feedback!
8 years ago
Pawpaw seeds need a 6-8 month stratification. This can be achieved by planting them in the fall in a coldframe or outside, in pots or situ. Or, you can put the seeds in the refrigerator in a plastic bag with some moist peat moss. It is very important to keep the seeds moist- if they dry out they will lose their viability. I have had good success this season with the fridge method, my tray of 38 has had a high germination rate..although it takes a couple months for them to show themselves as they grow a deep taproot before any aboveground growth. Supposedly Pawpaw seedlings prefer partial shade in their adolescent stage- I have not verified this with experience.

If you want a quicker fix then buy a grafted Pawpaw tree. For superior cultivars with larger fruit and more flesh/less seeds, check out the work of Neal Peterson. Happy Pawpaw growing 
8 years ago
I would advise going out and observing ferns in their natural habitat..look at their associates and perhaps replace them for similar but more useful plants. For instance, you may find ostrich ferns growing near lilly of the valley, you could replace this for wild leek which has a similar growth habit. I would recommend growing ferns with Giant Solomans Seal, Ginseng, and Wild Ginger. Ostrich ferns are superior for use as a vegetable, I like to fry the fiddleheads in an egg/flour batter.

Brenda, I know this might be a sensitive topic, but the word 'invasive' just doesn't seem appropriate..sure they're aggresive and 'opportunistic' but to me 'invasive' implies some sort of motive or intention. Depending on the fern you have, their spreading habit may be of great use if they're edible(ostrich/cinnamon are good)- more fiddleheads to eat!!
8 years ago
We decided that in the design based on the space we were working with ...we wanted the in-between beds to be as accessible as possible as well as somewhat even and consistant down the hill. I'll have to get another video up as the entire area is sheet mulched now and partially planted! 
8 years ago
Irene, It's so nice to see a flickr friend  on here!! Thanks for all of the wonderful images you've posted. Here is the link to the video of the client's swaled hillside: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EV7OOXUEE1I ; (kind of a rough video, but you can see what I mean by the swales/beds, will have more updates soon)
8 years ago
Excellent idea- absolutely necessary!
http://www.apiosinstitute.org/
8 years ago