Kirk Hutchison

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since Feb 05, 2010
Originally from Los Angeles, now in San Diego but moving to Oregon this fall. Interested in permaculture since childhood, hoping to put it into practice now that I've graduated college.
Eugene, OR
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Recent posts by Kirk Hutchison

Feral honeybees seem pretty vigorous. They are all over my yard. And they love my plants, especially mint and carrot flowers.
6 years ago
I think the key lies in the definition of the word "profitable". A relationship between mycorrhizael fungi and trees is mutually profitable. I don't think the activities of, say, Rupert Murdoch should be described using the same term. Therefore, "profitable" for that which brings good to one or multiple parties, and "exploitative" for screwing over the other guy. If I make ropes, nets and baskets and the guy next door has a permaculture farm and we trade, it would be mutually profitable.
6 years ago
Seems to me that species fluctuate a great deal, but the general pattern of the ecosystem changes slowly. Which is basically what permaculture operates upon.
6 years ago

Kathleen Sanderson wrote:
You can feed coyotes to your chickens



6 years ago
Well, you could try planting a mesquite hedge to keep out deer. Mesquite should do well in your area, and it has lots of thorns, is nitrogen fixing, and produces edible pods. The trick would be protecting it until it got started.... maybe just some fencing around each tree till it got  big enough to survive on its own.
6 years ago
Hahaha, like seeing myself at that age. I was about eleven and a half when I first began to "see through the matrix" and learn about the world's problems. Four years later, I am just biding my time and learning skills (and experimenting in my backyard garden) until I can get land of my own.
6 years ago
*cough* smuggling *cough*
6 years ago
The better the climate is, the less to do. Dry areas will need a bit of work (such as the establishment of drought tolerant legumes) before you can kick back and relax. Once the system is up and running, It should continue with very little management (this is the principle behind food forests in general).
7 years ago
I think they have special domesticated breeds, and they usually eat the squab (young pigeon), as opposed to the old, gamey ones.
7 years ago