Dave Muckle

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since Jun 07, 2011
Pompano Beach, FL
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Recent posts by Dave Muckle

Getting back to bows for beginners - this thread had me reading up on a few models, and it seems that some compound bows are adjustable-draw (for example, I think I read one was 25 lbs. to 60 lbs.), and are easily adjustable without having someone work on the bow (that may have been from Hoyt's site).

I am thinking about getting one, but agree that now that I've waited this long, I should just keep searching pawn shops for a good deal.
7 years ago
Well, you all convinced me to try it, so - after measuring the pan I use the most, I bid  on, and won, a somewhat-classic Griswold pan with about the same bottom-area.

This one has been cooked on, and most of the center of the pan felt pretty slick.   Thing is, while the pan was/is black, it's not a horror-story of crud and/or rust... in fact, it looked just like I would expect a cast-iron pan to look after I had used it for a good while.    Now I'm both a bit adventurous, and a bit conservative... and a few other things...  but I don't see the need to bake this thing in a self-cleaning oven, use soap and water or anything that would cause me to have to go through the myriad of steps just to re-season it again.   I mean, I guess some people feel better about getting a new-to-them used cast-iron pan totally clean, as if it's a fresh start on a sanitary surface, but I don't have quite as many hold-ups about food (I've worked in restaurant kitchens when I was younger, and I think the image of the cast-iron pan on the horse's tail-end for a dusty, dirty trail ride that Paul put up here: http://www.richsoil.com/cast-iron.jsp  speaks plenty about what can be eaten on without causing ten different plagues).

At least i hope it does.

Anyway, I went with boiling water in it for a bit, then placing a mix of some olive oil (I know, I read not to cook with olive oil... but it's here and it's handy) and the fat off of bacon in it to re-coat the surfaces while the pan was still hot.  I sorta used the  oils/fats and multiple bunched-up paper-towels to "polish" the surface over and over to help bring up more of the older cooking stains, but the paper-towel was the most abrasive thing I used in it.   

So am I taking too many chances here, or do some of you buy old cast-iron cookware without knowing the owner and just pretty much get right to using it  (instead of the in-depth cleaning so many cast-iron topics seem to get into)?

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As an aside, I believe I have that ideal polymerized coating on the bottom of the aluminum/teflon pan I am finally done using (no, not the cooking-surface bottom... I mean the bottom that sits on the burner).  I didn't realize what it was, but knew it was hard and slick... much slicker than what the outside-aluminum started out to be.  It never hit me that, hey, that's an ideal cooking surface, and what I'd be aiming for with a cast-iron pan.  I think it was from the layers of bacon-grease that would drip down a little after I poured out excess grease each time I cooked bacon.
7 years ago
I wish I would have seen this before I used the "roll & tip" method with exterior latex paint on my family's old boat.  Apparently the latex can't be wet-sanded smooth, where-as rustoleum can?

Oh well... it's not like it looks terrible.
7 years ago

JRTgirl wrote:
I mean, afterall, humans have been blowing their noses in handkerchiefs for quite a while and have survived.



Did they survive?  It seems to me that back in the days before disposable tissues, disease and plagues were much more widespread.  Of course I'm not blaming the handkerchief entirely, but now that you brought it up... I can think of a number of ways it may not have been advantageous.

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I, too, use the snot-rocket technique when working outside.  I am no fan of handkerchiefs being used for snot.
7 years ago