• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
stewards:
  • Mike Jay
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Devaka Cooray
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Dave Burton
  • Dan Boone
gardeners:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
  • Mike Barkley

Soil Test Calculations

 
Posts: 28
Location: Noosa Hinterland QLD, Australia
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi All,

Looking to start doing soil tests with recommendations on how to improve the soil to produce nutrient dense foods
for small time farmers and market gardeners.

I have done a couple of courses and know the fundamentals but need to know more about how the calculation are been done.

At present I am working my way through Ideal Soil by Michael Astera which does a good job of explaining the how and why.

I have spoken to a couple of agronomist and they seem to make it some sort of black art,
which I don't buy as I think if you have the soil test results you will be able to identify what the soil needs in minerals.

Another issue is that most of the soil tests, are been conducted by company agronomists who are in turn selling their own product.
I believe you could use simple base minerals to achieve the desired result and which could be cheaper in the end.

I am also discovering that its also down to the person doing the report, because they are influenced by different authors and in turn
follow their methodologies.

Am I missing some thing and over simplifying the whole process?


So any advice or recommendations on getting the above information would be greatly appreciated.


Thanks in advance

Anthony
 
pollinator
Posts: 3243
691
transportation cat duck trees rabbit books chicken woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Anthony I am 100% with you on this.

I cannot figure it out, in much of society they take science and throw it away, yet in farming they take what is simple and make it super scientific. It makes no sense.

But getting off my soapbpax, and being more to the point to answer your question; the answer lies in the PH levels. All crops have a preferred PH range, and while all the proper major and micro nutrients help, without the proper PH levels, they are unable to uptake them. The hard part is getting a getting the PH right, for each varity of crop, consistently, year after year.

 
Anthony Saber
Posts: 28
Location: Noosa Hinterland QLD, Australia
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Travis,

My understanding is that once you get the minerals in the soil balanced, the PH should rebalance to around 6.4.
Also keep in mind that the PH around the rhizosphere of the plant can be quite different from the rest of the soil.

If you want to adjust the PH for certain plants and trees I would be adding amendments to make the soil either more alkaline or acidic
but remember that could in turn throw out the soil balance of the minerals as some may become unavailable.

I would do tests before I did this to the whole crop and see if it performs as expected.

I only use the PH of the soil to get a reading before I start the remineralisation process.

Cheers
Anthony
 
If you believe you can tell me what to think, I believe I can tell you where to go. Go read this tiny ad!
All of the video from the Eat Your Dirt Summit
https://permies.com/t/106759/video-Eat-Dirt-Summit
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!