Win a copy of For the Love of Paw Paws this week in the Fruit Trees forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton

Duck Wounds and Processing

 
Posts: 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi, all! We are totally new to homesteading, having been city folks until a year ago, and our first big adventure has been our Muscovy ducks. All was going well (or relatively) until the cold led to some frostbite on feet. We were planning to process our first birds this weekend, but now have a few questions related to the process/what we need to look for. Essentially:

1) Does anyone have a method that works to treat wounds on a Muscovy male/Goose size bird? He's much stronger that we would have guessed, so it requires 2 of us to hold him down and care for his wounds, and we found it very difficult when trying to warm up the frozen foot.

2) He has some blisters from the frostbite on his feet, and a few have opened/are bleeding. Is he ok to process (and eat), as long as none of the areas appear to be infected?

3) What are the things to look for, in general, to determine if a bird is safe to eat? We have tried to find a list, but haven't had any luck. Eating our own tomatoes for the first time last year felt risky, so we definitely want to cover our bases with the birds!

Thanks for any help/insights!
 
master pollinator
Posts: 4028
916
transportation cat duck trees rabbit books chicken woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
They are okay to eat.

As for treating their feet, your best bet is to slatther on Bag Balm. That also could have been used to prevent frost bite in the first place. We used it on the teats of our dairy cows when it got cold to prevent them from getting chapped ar frostbitten.
 
Travis Johnson
master pollinator
Posts: 4028
916
transportation cat duck trees rabbit books chicken woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Oh...it probably goes without being said, but do not use antibiotic anything if you plan to slaughter them soon. Every medication has a specific withdrawal time, so check that first IF you used anything on them with antibiotics. Not that it is bad if you did/did not. Organic Certification requires people to treat injured livestock.
 
Posts: 71
Location: Lewis County, WA USDA Zone 8b
11
cat dog trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

As for treating their feet, your best bet is to slather on Bag Balm.



Travis, have you tried Musher's Secret? I have it for my dog. I never thought about uses for other animals.
 
Don't listen to Steve. Just read this tiny ad:
dry stack retaining wall
https://permies.com/t/85178/dry-stack-retaining-wall
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!