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Three sisters on 30" beds

 
Posts: 3
Location: Maryland, USA - Zone 6b
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Hi all,

I would like to try out a variation of the "three sisters" (corn, bean, squash). Most of the techniques I have read about use mounds (e.g. different methods listed here: https://www.groworganic.com/organic-gardening/articles/three-sisters-companion-planting-method ), but I'm wondering if anyone has had success doing this in 30" beds. Any recommendations on what the layout/spacing would look like at that width?
 
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Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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I place the corn down the middle with beans about a hand width from the corn plant stalk, the squash go at the edge of the bed on both sides centered in relation to the corn stalks. (think of the corn stalks as eyes and the squash as the nose tip)

On our farm we have raised beds and no mounds.
 
Ryan Jay
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Location: Maryland, USA - Zone 6b
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Thanks Bryant - that's helpful!
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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If you use determinant tomato vines you can substitute them for the beans in the three sisters plantings, but you will need to use something like hemp twine to tie the vine to the corn stalk without harming the ear of corn.
I've done this one time by putting one tomato plant on each side of a 6 foot row of corn (Navaho blue), the corn was planted two deep and they did hold up the determinant tomatoes pretty well and provided the two ears of corn per stalk.

 
What kind of corn soldier are you? And don't say "kernel" - that's only for this tiny ad:
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