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continuing composting in discarded cement sacks?

 
Posts: 168
Location: Manila
urban cooking solar
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Hello all, my compost bins are full of a batch i started 24 days ago (turned every 96 hours, nice and dark, and i suspect will still continue to 'cook') and am considering transferring said batch to old cement sacks to vacate the bins as i still have lots of fallen leaves that i want to shred and start composting before the monsoons come in the second half of May. Will it make a big difference if i wash off the cement dust in the sacks first? And will this first batch 'aerate' better in sacks compared to the bin? Other things i should look out for if i do this?

Thanks in advance.
 
pollinator
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Location: Ashhurst New Zealand (maritime temperate - 9b with cool summers)
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The volume of compost in the bags might be small enough that it no longer heats up. It may be past that point anyway. I wouldn't bother washing the bags...portland cement is mostly plant food with lots of calcium and iron. Are the sacks made of thick paper? That will break down relatively quickly and become part of the compost.
 
pusang halaw
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Thank you Phil, the sacks are plastic weave and i think will breakdown in time but i doubt will be beneficial to the soil. I went ahead filled one sack and freed one of my bins and no longer hesitant to fill a few more and free up my other bins.
 
Phil Stevens
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I use polypropylene feed sacks for all sorts of things, including storing and moving finished compost. Probably the same stuff your cement sacks are made of. It does degrade if exposed to the sun, but if you keep them shaded they last a long time.
 
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