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Stink Bug Coming to a Farm Near You

 
Posts: 61
Location: Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
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Interesting. as anyone down south had an issue with this critter yet? It seems they are on the right path at least, pursing a natural predator. I'm guessing polyculture would also provide some defense.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/scientists-race-to-kill-crop-destroying-stink-bug-expected-to-swarm-ontario/article2228578/
 
Posts: 120
Location: Hamilton, MT
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forest garden chicken bee
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I have experience with these critters as they swamped my squash beds this summer.  After much readying, I made the investment in an Effective Microorganism (EM) product by the company SCD Probiotics.  Their Bio Ag product is a mixture of varying EM, which when mixed to specs with water can be sprayed on the vegetables to stop stink bug effects.  How?  The EM go to work on the eggs and larvae of the Stink Bugs which are typically laid on the underside of leaves.  It took me about two weeks to get things to a point where I saw their presence drop, but it was spraying the underside every 2-3 days.  The EM is completely natural, and quite honestly, a hugely amazing product to use on many levels.  Good luck!
 
Posts: 292
Location: Harrisonburg, VA
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I'm in Virginia and we're swamped with the little bastards.  I personally lost far more yield to grasshoppers this year.  Anyone else see the biblical plague play out in their neighbors gardens/fields while their own land fought back?  I feel like I have so many birds that while the hoppers took a dent, the birds were smiling the whole time
 
David Miller
Posts: 292
Location: Harrisonburg, VA
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Tim Southwell wrote:
I have experience with these critters as they swamped my squash beds this summer.  After much readying, I made the investment in an Effective Microorganism (EM) product by the company SCD Probiotics.  Their Bio Ag product is a mixture of varying EM, which when mixed to specs with water can be sprayed on the vegetables to stop stink bug effects.  How?  The EM go to work on the eggs and larvae of the Stink Bugs which are typically laid on the underside of leaves.  It took me about two weeks to get things to a point where I saw their presence drop, but it was spraying the underside every 2-3 days.  The EM is completely natural, and quite honestly, a hugely amazing product to use on many levels.  Good luck!



I personally have no interest in relying on any system that has outside inputs factor into its persistence/sustainability. In other words I personally intend to get to the point where I do not need any outside inputs or controls.  My land will self sustain or my work is in vain.
 
Tim Southwell
Posts: 120
Location: Hamilton, MT
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forest garden chicken bee
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Fair enough... then look to interplant native perennials to attract predator insects, use mulch as a ground cover to encourage spider habitat, and spread out your squash plantings with other edible plants to confuse the buggers. 
 
David Miller
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Location: Harrisonburg, VA
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Tim Southwell wrote:
Fair enough... then look to interplant native perennials to attract predator insects, use mulch as a ground cover to encourage spider habitat, and spread out your squash plantings with other edible plants to confuse the buggers. 



That's my approach, I'm planting a wildflower mix (50 natives) in and around my "orchard" area that just happens to border my kitchen garden.  I hope that I can help nature create a balance so that one species can't get the upper hand.  In other words I hope that next year the worms won't get all of my plums
 
                          
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millerdavidpatrick wrote:
I personally have no interest in relying on any system that has outside inputs factor into its persistence/sustainability. In other words I personally intend to get to the point where I do not need any outside inputs or controls.  My land will self sustain or my work is in vain.



Permaculture systems are a deliberate mix of biology we select, and some we don't.  Some outside inputs are needed to establish a self-sustaining piece of land, and I have nothing against importing genetics in the form of new seeds or cuttings.  Why is importing a beneficial microbe strain any different?  I'm all for maximizing genetic diversity to repair an out of balance (invasive pest) system. 

A swarm of stink bugs sounds like chicken heaven, but chickens are also an initial outside input to the system... 
 
David Miller
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Location: Harrisonburg, VA
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Yeoman Farmer wrote:
Permaculture systems are a deliberate mix of biology we select, and some we don't.  Some outside inputs are needed to establish a self-sustaining piece of land, and I have nothing against importing genetics in the form of new seeds or cuttings.  Why is importing a beneficial microbe strain any different?  I'm all for maximizing genetic diversity to repair an out of balance (invasive pest) system. 

A swarm of stink bugs sounds like chicken heaven, but chickens are also an initial outside input to the system... 



I guess I'm confused as to your approach.  You're buying a bacteria or fungus and then spraying your trees with it?  What is the bacteria or fungus?  I'm all for priming a pump (lord knows I've brought in two loads of cow manure that doesn't count as on site, millions of seeds and lord knows how many loads of leaves from neighboring land).  My point is that I don't want anything that I have to buy and apply every year.  If I had to make compost tea and spray that every year I'd be less likely to dismiss it but is sounded like you were buying a sort of biological agent from some proprietary company and would need to reapply each year.  Did I read wrong?
 
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