Win a copy of Grocery Story this week in the City Repair forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
stewards:
  • Mike Jay
  • paul wheaton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
garden masters:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • James Freyr
  • Greg Martin
  • Dave Burton
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Dan Boone

Help with hedgerow

 
Posts: 13
Location: Fayetteville, AR
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey guys, wondering if i could get some good tips with a hedgerow i'm planning for a newer house.  The section is a 20 yard right up close to the road at the beginning of a 100 yard drive to this house.  Trying to plan a sustainable row that will not receive alot of care, with some quick growing things that will get outgrown by longer, bigger things that will establish a permanent hedgerow.

This is in NW Arkansas, zone 7.  Here is a pic of the area (out close to the road. http://t.co/aLqLrd1J

What would some good varieties and species be to start looking at?  Also, does anyone recommend bamboo in open areas like this, even with protective barriers around the area to keep it from spreading?

Thanks for any and all help to get me started!
 
pollinator
Posts: 4437
Location: North Central Michigan
21
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
well Arkasas is not as snowy as here in Michigan but I planted varieties of evergreens along our fence and love them.

maybe jerusalem artichokes for a nearly instant hedgrow..they grow at least 8 to 10 feet tall by  the second year and will always come back, esp if you harves some of them so they don't overcrowd, and they are pretty

not sure if they would be green all year in your climate or not
 
Posts: 67
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Most running bamboo will convert that area into a closed grass forest fairly quickly. Bissetii is the shortest running bamboo at around 20 feet. You could try a shrub bamboo that is 4 to 10 feet. I am not familiar with the genera outside of Phyllostachys, but Lewis bamboo and many other sites have good descriptions. The area looks residential, what restrictions do you have if any, and how close are the neighbors?

I am considering hazelnuts/filberts as the start of a hedgerow. I've also thought about crape myrtle, osage orange, hawthorne, and various semi-dwarf fruit trees.
 
Posts: 183
Location: Vashon WA, near Seattle and Tacoma
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Rosa rugosa, for sure, and sea buckthorn. Between the rose hips, the sea buckthorn berries, and the hawthorn berries, you could have your own Vitamin C factory. Sea buckthorn is a nitrogen fixer, which, the authorities say, would promote the growth of the other plants in the hedgerow.
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4437
Location: North Central Michigan
21
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
da-w I also have a hedge of hazelnuts on the north side of my forest garden..and it has really grown and filled in fast..right now they are quite short though (they might be dwarfs)..

also wild plum makes a nice hedge..

on a fencline I have raspberries and blackberries which make a good hedge if you want food..they are on lattice.

blueberries also make a  nice hedge if you have acidic soil
 
She'll be back. I'm just gonna wait here. With this tiny ad:
Solar Dehydrator Plans - Combo Package download
https://permies.com/t/solar-dehydrator
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!