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Nectarine tree, fungus issues

 
Posts: 3
Location: Danville California
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I've got two nectarine trees, one next to the other, and I live in Danville, California. The trees have leaves that are very sick, with what looks like leaf curl, and the fruit is still small but now has a lot of white dots/areas.

Clearly, the trees are sick and need me to spray them after the leaves fall and again before spring. (I read that online)

My question is this: what should I do until fall? Should I now remove all the fruit, leaves, prune away the younger branches etc? Will that make it easier on the trees? There's no point in the trees investing all this energy in growing fruit that we won't eat.
 
gardener
Posts: 6274
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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This is one of those situations where you really want to use an aerated compost tea spray as soon as possible and continue spraying once a month until winter hits.
The microorganisms in the compost tea will both attack the disease and protect the trees from a recurrence, don't worry if the spray hits the soil, that is where the disease over winters so spraying the soil will destroy the disease there too.

Sadly this years crop is a loss but you need to get the disease under control now not wait till later, which will just make the trees sicker or kill them.
 
Yoni Adams
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Location: Danville California
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Thank you Bryant. I've never made compost tea. I found a few resources online which I can follow, but would like to ask you if you have any beginners tips? I've very new to all these aspects of gardening, owned this house only since September.

Also - should I be removing the fruit that's currently on the tree? No point in growing it and wasting the tree's energy, right?
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1028
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hau Yoni, sadly that tree is pretty much beyond recovery from your photos.
If you have some good compost that was made with both bacteria and fungi then you could mix a shovel full of that with non chlorine water and add air to that for about 24 hours, then you would strain into a sprayer and spray the tree all over, leaves, branches and trunk, pour the rest into the soil around the base of the tree.
It might need about 10 to 20 gallons to get everything treated well.

I would remove the fruits and look at removing any branches that show signs of bark deterioration before trying to treat the remaining parts of the tree.
 
Yoni Adams
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Location: Danville California
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What photos are you referring to?
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1028
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I am so embarrassed, I was referring to photos from another post I was working on at the same time and got them mixed up, my horrible mistake. Thank you for catching that.

Leaf curl can show on fruits either as whitish spots or brownish spots, sometimes these will have the look of a target bullseye.
The application of an aerated compost tea (I use a large aquarium bubble stone and pump to make mine) has stemmed the spread of leaf curl.
It might also be a magnesium and manganese defect in the soil some Epsom salts spread around the tree and watered in is an easy way to make that determination.
If the tree starts to look better inside a week, it is a mineral defect causing the issue.

Redhawk
 
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