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green bay tree could be a problem in hugulculture

 
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Hello
I am tring to make a mix beetwen  rasied bed and  hugulculture bed.
We found a vert dry yucca to put on the bottom and than we found a still green bay tree (fresh) that we would like to use over  the yucca as gree organic material.
Both will be cover by a small layer of soil and than compost

The bay tree could be a problem??

Thanks fro your help
Frank
 
pollinator
Posts: 3625
Location: Toronto, Ontario
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Welcome to Permies, Frank.

What kind of bay tree are you talking about? There are two North American, a Carribean, and an European tree called "Bay." You'd have to be more specific for us to say.

From what part of the world do you hail? That might give us an idea.

Generally, though, the only types of problem tree for hugelkultur are either those that have high quantities of decay-inhibiting compound within them, like black locust, which is possessed of an unlikely high amount of antifungal compound by weight, or those that sprout aggressively from green parts, or sometimes those that have allelopathic properties that stunt all other growth.

All of these issues, except for material that won't decay, and material that spreads its allelopathy to the surrounding soil, are temporary, as water will dilute and biological action wash away any chemical compound.

-CK
 
Frank Franco
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I am from south italy so I think it is european bay tree
https://www.google.com/search?q=alloro+italiano&client=firefox-b-d&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwib8oD5pdXiAhVI2qQKHSUEClgQ_AUIECgB&biw=1366&bih=654

I read your answer and thank you, it is very usefull but i am not expert soI dont know if the bay tree is reach of decay-inhibiting  
I know that the green organic is necessary to make start the decay of dry organic (in my case yucca), do you think that the european bay tree is good for that?If yes it is better to put just the leaves or also the branches?

THanks fo the help
Frank
 
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Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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Laurel tree wood is not allopathic nor does it have an abnormally long time to decay.
The leaves and cambium are full of essential oil but that will not create issues in composting either the leaves or the woody stems.
Your compost heap or hugel will not have many issues with ants since ants avoid the odor of the laurel trees.

Redhawk
 
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