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Any recent Rocket Mass Heater advances or breakthroughs?  RSS feed

 
Jesse Chastain
Posts: 8
Location: Eugene/Roseburg
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Hello,
I am gathering materials for my first rocket mass heater and I am wondering about any recent advances or breakthroughs in design. I have the book and have watched all the videos I can find. I am going to make an 8 inch system with a bench and a 55 gallon drum. Has anyone found improved methods or materials over the book? Any updated information would be great. If not, I am excited to build a system straight from the book. Thanks, Jesse
 
Gary Park
Posts: 146
Location: St. Louis, MO
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It seems like there aren't a lot of bigger systems out there. Most of them are all made for cottages in the 500-1000 square foot range. I think people with big houses tend not to be as interested in building their own super efficient stove, let alone building it multiple times to figure out how to make it work right. I'm getting ready to build one for a total of 3000 square feet(basement doubles square footage). I'm going to stick with the 6" duct because it's more tested, but I'll have some hard facts when I'm done on how much it can accomplish. Make sure you clean ALL the paint off your drum before using it.
 
                            
Posts: 12
Location: Asturias - Spain
 
random bisbee
Posts: 30
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It seems some one has made a rocket stove breakthrough with the Kimberly stove. http://www.unforgettablefirellc.com/ Very costly and very little tech information but a breakthrough. Have you heard of a Swedish torch or a stump stove? How about a sawdust stove? Making a rocket stove out of wood, cool hey? Maybe this type of fuel could be used in a regular rocket for longer untended burn? It seems the new Kimberly stove works at it best with a 5lb extruded pressed log. How about surround the stump or sawdust fuel cell in metal with a air intake hole and a door to refuel the stove. Then add a insulated riser tube and sealed exhaust chamber over the stump or sawdust fuel cell, could make a cool rocket stove! Some of the stump stoves will burn from 2 to 8 hrs depending how big around and tall. Just a idea!
 
Gary Park
Posts: 146
Location: St. Louis, MO
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Heating a home with that little guy would be a little impractical for most people. Looks nice, but not enough tech info about it.
 
Lolly Knowles
Posts: 159
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Whole house? I don't think so.

But it seems it might be an alternative as a room heater. I have a 24X24 addition to the house that isn't on the heating system and an RMH probably won't help the resale value next year.
 
Roger Lehet
Posts: 2
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Hello all,

Roger from Unforgettable fire llc, inventor of the Kimberly stove.

Most folks have a hard time at first understanding our little creation, and cost is usually the first big question, comparing this to a rocket stove would be the second. I think the best place to start is that the market standard stoves ( which I sold, installed, and maintained professionally for years {Pacific energy, Country, Vermont castings, regency, Osburn and many others}) have a single flame path with secondary combustion air injected in at the front of the baffle at the top of the flame to create a longer burn time. rocket stoves are much the same but were originally conceived for cooking purposes in third world applications as an in expensive method of replacing the indoor camp fire normally used by mothers trying to cook for their family in an impoverished lifestyle. These methods use tons of fire wood ( The damage seen to the Amazon Forest) and create completely unhealthy air quality conditions.

The Kimberly gets called a wood stove when it is in fact a gasifying stove, but few people would understand the vernacular. The bottom fire is barely strong enough to keep the fuel pile at more than a smoldering rather than an aggressive and clean burn, it is in a sense a generator of fuel for the secondary fire ( a completely separate fire zone) on the top of the stove, which often hits internal temperatures of 1400 to 1700 deg F. Since wood combustion is complete at 1100 deg f. we get a long burn on the bottom with and aggressive gas re-burn on the top.

Cost.......there are 118 precision laser cut and welded high grade stainless steel parts in this stove, the certification has so far cost me over $42,000.00 for EPA, UL LIST and CSA for Canadian export........While we have one of the most expensive wood stoves ever built ( all domestic materials and craftsmanship) our completed package price is very average when compared to the awesome stoves I used to sell due to the decrease in construction costs of the complete installation, while providing far more in accessories such as our thermo electric generator, oven, hot water coils and portability, not to mention the fact that it can be safely installed in the tiny space where most stoves can not go.

The best testimony for this stove fooled even myself. We actually used two Kimberly's in a display in North Eastern Oregon to heat up a 3000 sq/ft single story house from 45 deg F (with an outside temp of 34 deg F.) to 71 deg F. in under 12 hours and held that temperature with the door opening and closing as people came and went. Even I was a bit shocked at this. The disclaimer......this home was brand new (never before heated) but had r 40 in the ceilings, 30 in the floors, 19 in the walls and good double panes......as with any heating source there has to be three key aspects in heating (1) heat production (2) heat retention (3) heat circulation. In this case we had all three components working in harmony.......in this way we advertise the best case scenario of 1500 sq/ft capability.

I hope this helps people wondering if we are nuts, but it really does work. For more information feel free to email me directly at


Sales@unforgettablefirellc.com

Thank you
Roger & Bridget Lehet inventors/founders





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