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Cold climate fig tree positioning on South side of hill?

 
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So I just went out and bought myself a Peters Honey Fig tree. Trying to decide where on my property is best for its survival. I live on a fairly steep hill with sandy soil, the back edge of my property is overgrown with 30ft tall Laurels that slowly poison everything near it. ( I want to chop them all down, but my husband likes the privacy since the neighbors behind us would tower over us.) Front yard soil is way dryer than the back yard. There is a wall running down the back portion of the east side of my property for protection from the wind (close to the laurels though.) So would it be better to risk the wind exposure and plant in the middle of my back yard, or the ‘laurel exposure’ by the east wall and hope for the best?
 
pollinator
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Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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What part of the world are you in?
 
Andrea Arens
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I live in Coastal BC, Canada. So I have dryish summers, mild but wet winters reaching (usually) no colder than -12c. Some years theres hardly any freezes, other years it can sit just below -0c for weeks. (Zone 7-8 )
 
pollinator
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Location: Virginia USDA 7a/b
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I don't know anything about laurels, but we have related plants such as azaleas and rhododendrons, and the figs do fine. In my zone a rough winter will kill the figs- even the "hardy" figs, to the ground. They come back quick. In mild winters, the protected figs have breba or spring figs! Plant both and keep one. I would save protected southern exposure for really questionable plants. For me that is olives and feijoa with hardy citrus next year.
 
Ken W Wilson
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Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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You might plant the one you have by the laurels and buy a hardier one for the exposed location.
 
Andrea Arens
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Yeah that’s good idea Ken, I was thinking about a hardy Chicago but I’m not sure if I’ll like the taste. I’ve seen people in the area with quite large fig trees that are easily 20’ so there definitely at east some varieties that can thrive here.
 
Ken W Wilson
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Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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I have Hardy Chicago in Missouri. I like them, but I haven’t had many others to compare them with.
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