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Spring Water Air Conditioner, staying cool on the homestead

 
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 Just got home from making a video of our property in the Ozarks and it sure was hot but with my redneck air conditioner we were able to sleep pretty good and the best thing is it was free, well to run anyway. This was a trial run so its pretty much hob cobbed  together and while it was not cold air because I ran  a line at least 600 ft on the ground so it warmed up somewhat before it got to the radiator, but it was cool enough to help a lot.
 If anyone has done anything like this or have any ideas on how to make it better feel free to comment.
 Here is my video


Thanks for watching and God bless.
 
pollinator
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Location: Toronto, Ontario
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I think that even a run of 600 feet would be fine if it was in a trench, even a shallow one. I mean, it would cool the trench itself for a bit, but if it ran continuously, that would be a fairly minor thing, as there'd be no more, or relatively little more, heat energy left in the soil surrounding the trench to warm it.

That's pretty awesome, William. I like the piped spring water idea for cooling, and I think it might even apply, to some extent, to purpose-built dual-mode hydronic systems, where it's conventional hot water in the cold season, but circulates cold spring water in the hot season. That would need to then go into a holding tank or something for irrigation, so as to not be wasted, but still, it's a damn sight better than sticking a noisy box in a window and generating more heat than is being removed from your dwelling and pumping it into the atmosphere.

-CK
 
William Egan
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Chris Kott, Thanks, glad you liked it, When I get to it I will save the run off into a natural swimming pond I plan to build. I have also been thinking about building a cooler with a radiator inside instead of a refrigerator, it would be on the north side of my house and would also have a small door to open to the outside in cooler weather to keep things cold inside. We are starting with raw land and will be off grid, I love the challenge.
 If you aren't lucky enough to have a spring you could build a cistern or use an old well to circulate the water with a solar powered pump. I have built several septic tanks by digging a hole about 5 ft. round and 5 ft. deep, put several layers of welded fencing and about 2 in. of sand cement mix. Pour a top and bottom and you have a really cheap solid tank that will hold up for years. It would probably be better suited for a  dual-mode hydronic system too.
 Thanks for watching and feel free to check out my other video's if you get time, I'm kind of a redneck innovator, my videos not quality but most of them are my ideas.
 
The permaculture playing cards make great stocking stuffers: http://richsoil.com/cards
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