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Hugelkultur build #1

 
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I started last night after receiving 10 year old rotted orange wood stumps. It’s layered to about 12-16”. I have the following items to add. Any suggestions on which order?
-lemon tree clippings(fresh)
-manure(rabbit and chicken w/bedding)
-wood chips(2-3 weeks old)
-half finish compost( feels a bit compacted)
-straw or hay from feed shop
-garden soil for topping.
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[Thumbnail for F92616E6-FAD8-4756-A31C-EC16B0E7E9BF.jpeg]
 
Steven Arthur
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My first thought was that the leaves might block water flow to the logs. I’m leaning towards placing them on top the logs to fill in gaps. I can get more for further layers. I also thought about dumping manure on top of the logs and leaves to help break things down.
 
pollinator
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Location: Toronto, Ontario
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hugelkultur dog forest garden fungi trees rabbit urban wofati cooking bee homestead
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I have heard concerns about leaf litter forming impermeable membranes, and have had issues using it as mulch for those reasons. If you can chop the leaves up at all by running a lawnmower over them or putting them in a blender, say, they will no longer form those mats that keep the water out.

I would suggest that you apply fungal slurries to your wood and leaves. I like oyster mushrooms, but if you can get winecaps, those are also good. It's a pretty good bet that a hugelbeet with healthy mycelia will have fewer problems with impermeability of carbonaceous resources.

-CK
 
Steven Arthur
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How do I make a fungi slurry?
 
Chris Kott
pollinator
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Location: Toronto, Ontario
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hugelkultur dog forest garden fungi trees rabbit urban wofati cooking bee homestead
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Literally take mushrooms of the type you want to grow, put them in a blender with water and blend them until it's slurry-like. Then apply to the carbonaceous component of your bed.

More details and more soil information than you could possibly ever want are available if you care to peruse Dr. Bryant Redhawk's Epic Soil Wiki.

-CK
 
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