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Bamboo Glued Laminated Timber

 
          
Posts: 3
Location: Puchong, Malaysia
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Hello and good day to all. I hope this post is in the right place.

I am a researcher in the field of Glued Laminated Timber in Malaysia. To the uninitiated, glulam is the use of 100% timber structure in which high rise building and road bridges have been built. And yes, should an argument broke out, timber is highly resistant to fire than concrete. I have personal experience with a burned down building of both timber house and concrete structures. Let me say, a concrete building will only last as long as the steel is solid while timber will char and harden...should the artisan designed it correctly...there's plenty of research papers on that in comparison.

Sorry for talking too much about fire because that is always the first thing people argue about. My expertise is in glulam reinforcement and material manufacture. Right now I am to embark on a research to introduce mass farming of timber for glulam manufacturing in our region. Our aim is timber grade bamboo. We have received research grants and in the progress of educating our political lords. We are a democratic nation with a feudalistic practice in truth.

Malaysia have a lot of high value timber species including latex trees which is suitable in cold climate. This caused us to have developed a blind spot in the field of bamboo timber that we commonly see as inferior. When we got timber as hard as steel with high silica content that can blunt steel saw it is natural that bamboo is ignored.

The thing is, I have been tasked to proposed what timber species to introduce for commercial growing here. Any ideas? I would be honoured to receive your advise and recommendations. Our country will face a dark future...palm oil export facing embargoes and soon Europe will produce  cold climate grown latex. The south east Asian countries are clueless of the impending economic disaster of the near future...unless we realign our economic policy.

Just for sharing, I am a lurker permaculturist. Most of my research is done in secret still awaiting publication and hopefully a tenured position once there an opening for me to apply.

Attached is a picture recent achievement of my soil engineering experiment at our family orchard in 2019. We managed to grow a giant taro plant in our food forest beneath the canopy of Jering, Rambutan, Jackfruit, Durian, Sweet Bamboo and Gaharu Trees...take note my height is 183 cm or 6 foot tall...peeking behind a leaf is my mother...the taro shoot is very sweet eaten raw taste like a spongy apple.

It was a pleasant surprise to see an experiment gone wild. The fertilizer were meant for our Gaharu and Durian trees but accidentally caused monstrous growth of our taro.
WhatsApp-Image-2019-01-01-at-5.04.49-PM.jpeg
[Thumbnail for WhatsApp-Image-2019-01-01-at-5.04.49-PM.jpeg]
 
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Ao Az wrote:Hello and good day to all. I hope this post is in the right place.

I am a researcher in the field of Glued Laminated Timber in Malaysia. To the uninitiated, glulam is the use of 100% timber structure in which high rise building and road bridges have been built. And yes, should an argument broke out, timber is highly resistant to fire than concrete. I have personal experience with a burned down building of both timber house and concrete structures. Let me say, a concrete building will only last as long as the steel is solid while timber will char and harden...should the artisan designed it correctly...there's plenty of research papers on that in comparison.

Sorry for talking too much about fire because that is always the first thing people argue about. My expertise is in glulam reinforcement and material manufacture. Right now I am to embark on a research to introduce mass farming of timber for glulam manufacturing in our region. Our aim is timber grade bamboo. We have received research grants and in the progress of educating our political lords. We are a democratic nation with a feudalistic practice in truth.

Malaysia have a lot of high value timber species including latex trees which is suitable in cold climate. This caused us to have developed a blind spot in the field of bamboo timber that we commonly see as inferior. When we got timber as hard as steel with high silica content that can blunt steel saw it is natural that bamboo is ignored.

The thing is, I have been tasked to proposed what timber species to introduce for commercial growing here. Any ideas? I would be honoured to receive your advise and recommendations. Our country will face a dark future...palm oil export facing embargoes and soon Europe will produce  cold climate grown latex. The south east Asian countries are clueless of the impending economic disaster of the near future...unless we realign our economic policy.

Just for sharing, I am a lurker permaculturist. Most of my research is done in secret still awaiting publication and hopefully a tenured position once there an opening for me to apply.

Attached is a picture recent achievement of my soil engineering experiment at our family orchard in 2019. We managed to grow a giant taro plant in our food forest beneath the canopy of Jering, Rambutan, Jackfruit, Durian, Sweet Bamboo and Gaharu Trees...take note my height is 183 cm or 6 foot tall...peeking behind a leaf is my mother...the taro shoot is very sweet eaten raw taste like a spongy apple.

It was a pleasant surprise to see an experiment gone wild. The fertilizer were meant for our Gaharu and Durian trees but accidentally caused monstrous growth of our taro
.



Hello! I am not able to give you any ideas about which timber may be good to grow, but hopefully someone else will be able to offer some suggestions.
I (and others, I am sure) would be very interested to hear about your soil engineering experiment, however! Can you give an idea of what that is about?
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