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!!!!!!!! Homestead Essentials

 
pioneer
Posts: 153
Location: St. Andrews West, Ontario, Canada (Zone 5b)
36
hugelkultur forest garden trees foraging medical herbs homestead
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First episode of a new series called "Homestead Essentials". This one is all about "Partnering with NATURE". This series will feature homesteading and permaculture principles but in a demonstrative and observational fashion, rather than instructional or explanatory.

Thank you for watching. Feedback and constructive criticism most welcomed!


 
Posts: 254
Location: On the plateau in TN
22
urban books food preservation
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Nice video, like you point out many stills, so no thoughts, of points.  Blue smoke, I do this too, But seems like you have a screened burner to minimize embers.

I have about about 0.6 acre to mow, have a push mower, but what really helped was the addition of a riding lawn mower that is used as well that collects the a lot of grass, so usually minimizing raking clumps of grass now.  I have a man made detention pond about 3 meters wide in back with feeds drainage ditches that slowly go into backyard area that is lower area.  i do use a small rake to spread out the bags of grass we collect and dump.  So I use a push mower around drainage ditches and wetter areas, or heavy weeds.

The grass we collect is great to build up low areas, and weed suppression.   I am not sure how naked soil for a garden was created.   I double dug, once and never step in my bed areas.
 
Matt Leger
pioneer
Posts: 153
Location: St. Andrews West, Ontario, Canada (Zone 5b)
36
hugelkultur forest garden trees foraging medical herbs homestead
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Hey Michael. Thanks for the reply! This first video was basically just a mishmash of odds and ends. In hindsight it may not have been the best choice for a first episode, but it had to go somewhere. I was trying to capture the basic vibe and ambiance of our property (when the neighbour's 20 something dogs are not yapping). Hopefully some of that made it through.

Our property is about 5 acres, mostly zone 4 and 5. The 3 year old food forest/Hugelkultur now extends into zone 3 and zones 2 and 1 are the kitchen garden and raised beds out front. You'll see a lot more of that stuff in the coming episodes. They will also be much more topic-specific.

The outdoor fireplace was a birthday gift from my family a few years back. I love it! It does minimize on embers quite a lot. Makes a big difference, especially if you're in a dry wooded area like we are.

The blue smoke is probably the result of me showing my daughter how to make a sandwich of punky logs and chopped, dry wood to help keep the bugs away.

As for the lawnmower, I could never mow it all manually. I'd be dead. Even with all the grass we've phased out with other ground cover and wood chips, there is still a good hour and a half of mowing to do each time. But I do own a ride mower. The tire was just broken at the time but it's fixed now. We do exactly as you do. We use our lawn clippings to feed and mulch certain plants once it has a chance to dry in the sun and has yellowed a bit. The peas love it!

Naked soil seems so unnatural to me. Soil compaction is a big problem here so I also try to do the same and avoid stepping anywhere I use for growing. Eventually, the idea is that the entire front yard will be mulched with wood chips and/or straw and I'll only have to mow the backyard. All the while, I'll be build carbon layers in the soil. The only BIG missing ingredient really is animals to take our composting to the next level. We are very close to getting some laying hens. Just gotta work on a good infrastructure and then implementation strategies before bringing in animals. There are a lot of predators around so I want to play it safe and protect my investments.

 
Michael Moreken
Posts: 254
Location: On the plateau in TN
22
urban books food preservation
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Yes, Matt

I had to garden on north side of house, (back) to get away from the black walnut trees I cut down on 3 sides!
 
Matt Leger
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Posts: 153
Location: St. Andrews West, Ontario, Canada (Zone 5b)
36
hugelkultur forest garden trees foraging medical herbs homestead
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Homestead Essentials: Compost Tea

Exactly what it sounds like in the title: Compost Tea. You take some nutrient-rich plants (like stinging nettle and dandelion leaves) and bust them up in a plastic bucket. Add some water until the whole thing is completely saturated but you still have some room to avoid spillage at the top of the bucket. After that, just find a way to pump air into the bottom of the bucket. This can be accomplished with a compressor like I did, or a pump from a fish tank, or some type of aerator. The possibilities in design are endless and they are really based on your particular needs and set-up.

You can use compost tea to add valuable nutrients to any plant. Just pour that devilishly-nasty smelling brew over the top soil of your plants. This works especially great for plants that are heavily mulched. The tea will slowly make it's way down to the roots and give them a fast-acting nutritional boost.

While compost tea may not be as effective at delivering vitamins, nutrients and biodiversity to your soil as traditional compost, it does have other advantages. It can be sprayed directly on the leaves as an effective insecticide and deterrent, for example, among many other uses.

Compost tea is great and has many applications.  Experiment with it and see what you can come up with. Let us know in the comments what worked for you and how you use compost tea in your garden or food forest.

Thanks for watching! :)

 
Acetylsalicylic acid is aspirin. This could be handy too:
Abundance on Dry Land, documentary, streaming
https://permies.com/t/143525/videos/Abundance-Dry-Land-documentary-streaming
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