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Hokkaido pumpkin growing

 
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Hey all
so i have posted quiet a lot about hokkaido pumpkins. next question, so i had a very successful start to the season loads of both flowers and loads pollinated i could tell they were pollinated from the size and the fact they didn't turn brown and fall off. But if a had 6 on my plant five would stop and 1 would become the strong grower. google says you should get between 8 and 10 per plant, i never expected this amount because im growing in a 60 litre pot. but i had hoped for more than 1. i cut the ripe 1 off and the plant seems to be starting to produce again. does it mean there's just to little food(nutrition) for the plant or what? 2 years growing both times only 1 pumpkin this year was better but still only 1 till now
thanks
 
Posts: 52
Location: New Mexico
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foraging greening the desert homestead
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I'm sorry I don't have an answer to your question, but I look forward to hearing what others say...

Our Hokkaido / Kuri is our most successful plant so far in our since-April greenhouse.  It's growing all over the place; we trellissed it and have trained it back & forth across the 17' width.  We started with one squash which is now nicely deep orange-red.  Now we have 7 pollinated squashes, and the newer 6 seem to be growing, but the biggest of the new ones is smaller than a softball still.

A question for you -- when did your 6 squashes come out?  Because our first squash was already turning orange by the time we got a 2nd.  We have been hand-pollinating because we don't have a ton of pollinators (high desert, not farmed for the last 800 years).

How did your failing squashes fail, and what was the timing?  Like did you have 6 peer squashes and then 5 stopped and 1 continued?  Where on the vine was the successful squash (upstream or downstream of the failed squashes)?  I had read you should cut the vine after you have a squash and only have one per vine -- we are way too greedy to do that, and I think most of the younger squashes set downstream of the orange squash, so we wouldn't have them if we had pruned as suggested.

Good luck with your squashes, and I hope you get some good answers / suggestions!
 
Martin Spencer
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thanks for the reply all my pumpkins came with days apart  a new 1 opened  everyday for about a week, they all grew together till 1 took over. the strongest was at the bottom of the plant the rest were at the top so it obviously got more nutrients because it was nearer the source. i had read about cutting the vine, but although i have a massive plant also trellised (vertical) which could also make a difference, i only have 1 main vine and everything branches out from there. and the pumpkin was on the main vine so not much to cut off. but as of posting this message i found 4 new pumpkins on the plant after it had looked like it was all over. so i think it might be a nutrient problem with mine, although i fertilized regularly. difficult to say
 
Kimi Iszikala
Posts: 52
Location: New Mexico
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foraging greening the desert homestead
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Update -- 3 of our pollinated squashes failed at about baseball size (dang, I thought if they made it far they'd be good to go!)
We still have 4 that look good.  The first is still nice and red, and good size -- I wonder if we should harvest it, or wait until the plant browns?  Do you harvest as soon as it looks mature?
There are 2 others getting more orangey and fairly good size.  The last is still more yellow, but bigger than a softball.

And yesterday i noticed that on a newer vine we now have three little fruits... wonder if they will amount to anything?

You said you fertilized regularly -- I wonder if you over-fertilized?  I think too much nitrogen can put all the growth into leaves and stalks instead of fruit?



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