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Anyone used Gibberellic Acid?

 
M Marx
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Location: Los Angeles
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John Polk just posted a link to a seed bank catalogue, I noticed a item they are selling to increase germination.
I searched and didn't find any conversation
http://jlhudsonseeds.net/GibberellicAcid.htm
Anyone used it?
They seem adamant that it should be accepted as a biodynamically/organically reasonable tool.
Seems interesting.
I guess my thoughts are that it might encourage lower performing seeds to germinate and reduce virility? but it is just a guess.
Overall, i don't see how it is different than what I saw geoff lawton do (via video) when he innoculates his seeds with bacteria (and fungus?).
 
Gray Simpson
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Location: McDonough, GA
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I did an experiment in 8th grade with gibberellic acid. It harmed lettuce seeds in a 500ppm concentration.
 
John Polk
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I think that gibberellic acid is only used on difficult to germinate seeds, or those that normally take months to germinate.
 
Saybian Morgan
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Gibberalic acid, were talking willow tea. Root stimulation is woody plants yes, a sharp reducer of transpiration loss yes. A seed germinator most likely in woody plant seeds. I wouldn't go around using it as a panacea on herbatious crops at germination time, willow is a mean competitor and even though many plants arn't alleopathic in contact with other plants they sure can put a rag on other plant types germinating. There is a reason why a climax forest stays a climax forest and doesn't go back into pioneer weeds, and it's probably linked to blocking former evolutionary generations from returning so there is space for the next stage of succession. If only apple tree's grew faster we could turn all those thorny black berry's into apple pies, mind you a blackberry pie is delicious just hard to get at.
 
John Polk
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I have never used GA (buy may at some time in the future).

For more info, try here:

http://www.crfg.org/tidbits/gibberellic.html


 
M Marx
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Location: Los Angeles
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@John, yeah it sounds like it is a good tool -- and thanks for that website, pretty awesome!
@Sabian -- I didn't completely follow your post, are you equating the effects of willow tea with GA and that willow tea is more for herbacious plants and GA for woody plants?
 
Saybian Morgan
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Willow contains giberalic acid and other acids, good for headaches and root growth. As for the weather it's an all out rooting hormone or a woody plant rooting hormone seems to be what's up for debate with trials. I have never herd of it being use on herbaceous cuttings "only woody cuttings and roots but it would be nice to be wrong about this. I just don't know why you'd need to buy it unless your region was completely devoid of willow. In regards to plats that are already up and running I picked up from bill mollison that applied as a foliar feed it sharply cuts off transpiration losses as does horsetail.
 
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