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high tensile electric fence problem

 
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I have a 3 strand high tensile perimeter fence that works fine.  When I connect a 3 strand high tensile electric fence to divide the field my charger (that usually reads 8.6 KV) will go to 1.2 blink two or three times and then the charger goes off.  The charger is an electric parmak good for 30 miles.  All three perimeter wires are hot and verified using a fence tester.  I have three ground rods spaced approximately 10 feet apart.  I have jumper wires connecting the perimeter fence at the feed line from the charger and then at the end of the perimeter fence, one at the halfway point and one where I put the divider fence.  The perimeter fence is 1572 feet so with 3 strands the total is 4716 feet of fence (less than 1 mile).  The divider fence is 384 feet times 3 strands of high tensile wire will equal 1152 feet of wire.  The divider fence only connects to the perimeter fence at one point.  At the other end of the fence where the fence ends I put a jumper wire to connect the three strands to themselves.  I have checked the fence insulators that are attached to the T post and the insul tube that goes around the wooden corner post and all are in good condition.  Any ideas what is going on?  Thanks
 
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Location: Richwood, West Virginia
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If you removed the jumpers connecting all three strands and put a charge on one strand at a time you might find which one is presenting the problem.
 
pollinator
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Location: Virginia USDA 7a/b
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hugelkultur forest garden hunting chicken food preservation bee
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You can use a amp meter as long as it holds the high reading. Measure amps along the fence and high reading will lead you to the short. Fence testers are made with that function from premier one and kencove.
 
Jim mackay
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Thanks for the replies.  I did remove the jumpers for the divider fence and each line worked individually.  However, when I jumped all three together the fence charger would blink twice and then go off.  I put the fence reader on the jumper wire from the perimeter fence to where it would jump to the division fence.  I had my wife plug in the charger and there was no reading on the fence reader which made sense since the charger went off after two seconds.  Would the charger do the blink and then go off if it could not power the added amount of fence or would it just pulse and the charger would stay on?  I have never had a charger just go off.  The fence is supposed to be able to handle up to 30 miles of fence.  Again, thanks for all replies and suggestions.
 
Tj Jefferson
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Location: Virginia USDA 7a/b
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hugelkultur forest garden hunting chicken food preservation bee
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That charger is only a 4.9j charger. I have no idea what the brush burden is on your fence but I have a 24 j charger for about 3x that distance. It should have a low voltage shut off function in the manual and I suspect that’s the issue but I don’t know. I have a 12j charger for the low wire since that one is the highest burden. In my experience most people don’t realize how many joules you need to push on a line with lots of small losses. Once you have a larger charger then you can trace the faults.

To give you an idea, my 24j charger will normally put out ~8j to charge to 8kv, but a few branches on the wire will make it push double the joules for 5kv, but that allows me to trace faults. I’ve also found that my buried insulated wires (Gates and initial wire run to the fence) are very significant losses. Like 1A per 20’. I have a few trees as posts and even with insulators I get induced current losses (pushing high voltage will do that) to where I can measure current in the tree!

Thought experiment- overheard power lines are 12.5kv and look at the insulation used. Little dinky tube insulators of crappy plastic with moisture will make losses pretty high.
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