• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton

cutting pruning forestry tools suggestions?

 
Instructor
Posts: 111
Location: Reno, NV
15
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi all,

I'm interested in hearing people's recommendations on tools, brands, suppliers, and fabrication techniques for quality food forest and woodlot management.

Heres a list of some tools that this might include: (Please add to the list because I am not too familiar with the options)

-pruners
-loppers
-pull saw
-chain saw
-chain saw mills
-Pole saw
-bark stripping knives
-chisels
-fruit pickers
-sickles
-scythes
-hatchet
-bandsaw mills
-other cutting tools
-scalpers
-Hodads
-other planting and digging tools
-electric fence
-fence chargers
-grounding tools and techniques in dry climates


thanks,
Neil
 
Posts: 3373
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
37
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
What is the goal for the harvest? Firewood, food, lumber, hugels, mulch, all of the above?

 
Posts: 159
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Stay away from chainsaw mills..more trouble htan they are worth..I have a Woodmizer bandsaw mill which is wonderful.

Silky saws are the best in hte world. period. can get them through Sherrilltree.
 
Lloyd George
Posts: 159
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
also: http://onescytherevolution.com/
 
neil bertrando
Instructor
Posts: 111
Location: Reno, NV
15
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

R Scott wrote:What is the goal for the harvest? Firewood, food, lumber, hugels, mulch, all of the above?



I think goals would be all of the above. not necessarily from the same patch. I would also include polewood, some seasonal fodder, scion for grafting, divisions, etc.

In general, I'm looking for a tool kit for a food forest manager who wants a diverse, multi-function perennial polyculture. Let's say this is not a hobby, but an occupation where the tools get used intensively and also get maintained regularly.

Modular tools, multi-function tools, and farm fabricated tools all get bonus points in my opinion.

 
steward
Posts: 979
Location: Northern Zone, Costa Rica - 200 to 300 meters Tropical Humid Rainforest
15
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Lloyd George wrote:Stay away from chainsaw mills..more trouble htan they are worth..I have a Woodmizer bandsaw mill which is wonderful.

Silky saws are the best in hte world. period. can get them through Sherrilltree.



Not exactly. The next time I have a 5 foot thick rare tree, you explain to me how you will cut it up with a woodmizer when what I want is high value slabs.

But, generally speaking, chainsaw mills are very wasteful, but not a bad thing to have around when the log is somewhere that you can't get it out easily, and you just want to harvest a few slabs.

And I have six sawmills, of the band saw type.

There are reasons why chainsaw mills sell, if someone just wants to rough cut some lumber, for example for a timber frame home, they are hard to beat. But not that good for wood production.
 
Fred Morgan
steward
Posts: 979
Location: Northern Zone, Costa Rica - 200 to 300 meters Tropical Humid Rainforest
15
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Most obvious thing I see missing is a brush cutter, and / or machete. Also, how are you going to plant? You are going to need a normal shovel for controlling water flow. Peavey and a Cant Hook are life savers, maybe literally. They will definitely hep your back stay healthy. These people make wonderful ones. http://www.logrite.com/

Climbing gear becomes important when you selectively harvest (I assume harvest due to sawmills). If the trees around a large tree is worth something to you, you have to take out the limbs, top, etc, first.
 
R Scott
Posts: 3373
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
37
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
PRO-GRADE chainsaws!!! Not the consumer line from ANYONE. Pick the brand based on the dealer you like/trust near you. The service is more important than the brand. And the safety gear to go with them.

Winches, rope, chains, rigging--it is a real challenge getting select cut lumbar out of a stand without tearing up good trees or the ground. AND THE SKILLS TO USE THEM!! Those tools are horribly overlooked by most homesteaders (I learned the hard way).

They also make log skidder tools for 4 wheelers and compact tractors that work great when you have small paths to work with. www.northerntool.com has a lot of them listed to give you ideas (I wouldn't buy most of the stuff from them, but it is a fun read).

Chipper/shredder--best way to accelerate compost is to chip and shred all the trimmings. It also reduces the fire danger in your woodlot. You just can't build hugelbeds with all of it. Mulch can be another revenue stream, especially if you have cedar or cypress. Cedar is considered an invasive weed here and you can get paid to clear them from pastures (and then paid for the mulch).

 
                    
Posts: 238
Location: AR ~ozark mountain range~zone7a
9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I like homemade bark scrapers. I use the largest (!2" or larger, dull, missused, trashedout flat files) for the blade, firmly weld a couple handles on each end & grind an razor edge. Also I always have my 'brushhook' with me, its looks like a 5" wide blade, about 12" long, sharp on both edges, has a hook at the bolo tip...fitted to an AXE handle with bolts. A beat up old pickup truck, that don't matter if mirrors & handles get ripped off or glass busted, & runs good, if you can swing it, a electric winch is pretty helpful.

wild;)
 
Lloyd George
Posts: 159
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Fred, you are right of course, I went through a CSM, but it is a giant PITA...it does have its uses, and I still have it...bu I doubt I will ever use it again....there is a cat down in TX with one 72" who cuts giant slabs for high doller tables...

My assumption is that the average user is looking to make farmstead lumber...I can cut a 20" wide board easily...but rarely do so, ans I usually making 2x for framing or some fraction of 1x for siding, flooring, fencing..etc...

When I want slabs, I call a buddy with a swingmill...I honestly think about the best value in recovering opportunity wood is a good sized swinger...can pack into the big monster logs or set and little guys brought to it..


I sure do love my Woodmizer though..I don't work for them..but they are wonderful machines...
 
The problems of the world fade way as you eat a piece of pie. This tiny ad has never known problems:
permaculture bootcamp - learn permaculture through a little hard work
https://permies.com/wiki/bootcamp
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!