• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Mike Haasl
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • James Freyr
master gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • jordan barton
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • Greg Martin
  • Leigh Tate

high desert

 
Posts: 3
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
i live in Arizona. I bought a 17.5 acres land in the northeast part. The town is called Clay Springs.
 


considered a  cool summer Mediterranean climate according to koppen
the Hardiness zone is 6b/7a i feel that this area is so unique, on the good side it has 6300 feet elevation, 280 sunny days a year, 18 inches of rain, 2 foot of snow. Pretty chilly though with only 160 day frost free.
how can i cultivate this pasture land and turn it into a market garden most cost-effectively?
i was thinking to shallow till amend with a mix of organic and minerals and plant during the growing season only. i do not want to invest in any green house yet.  
i have little money recourses but I'm willing to put my heart/soul on this project
I'm looking to start a balanced system of farming splitting the land 50% pasture and 50% arable land i got this insight from the book the farmer progress from the soil&health library. i would love and dream to have livestock 6 cows, 12 sheep, 200 chickens, 6 pigs.
currently, the land is all pasture.  the soil is a clumpy  clayee, loamy. 20/40 inch to bedrock, i got the information about soil on a Navajo soil survey from the U.S dep of agriculture.
i have no clue how to start this project and need a coach that done it before. turn soil into gold!
I'm a chef and own my restaurant. Feeding the community local good food is our goal. @hummusxpress
should i use livestock (sheep, cows) to clear all weeds and grasses in an effort to revitalize the pasture?
i heard keyline/subsoiling is very helpful to retain water.  keyline is costly though. I have 20k$$ total, there is water, heat and electric through out the farm..
my plan is to have  300+ fruit trees, a market garden on  50%,
and a pasture on ther 50% od total acreage. where i will manage graze sheep, chicken, cows. Thats is the plan so far
any information help.



20201115_110845.jpg
The land itself. The well is on top left side. Left is east
The land itself. The well is on top left side. Left is east
 
Posts: 24
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

To be clear, you mention growing food for local community.  

Your restaurant is up there? or is the plan to move up there?

I think I've eaten at your place if its the one on Broadway in Tempe.
 
Posts: 39
Location: 5000' Albuquerque, NM
22
hugelkultur forest garden building rocket stoves woodworking greening the desert
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Have you ever been to Boyce Thompson Arboretum about an hour SW of Clay Springs? Not currently a farm but an incredibly inspiring use of land with knowledgeable staff and practical ideas carried out over the past 100 years. You might find some local approaches and knowledge that would work for you. Their website is btarboretum.org
 
eddie hantas
Posts: 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
that is so sweet of you!!!
much love
 
eddie hantas
Posts: 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
thank you for recommending the Boyce Thompson Arboretum, looks amazing truly desert!~
if anyone knows  what are some of the pioneer plants in clay springs Arizona zone 6b/7a that will be helpful
I'm definitely getting 2 cows and 12 sheep to start this journey. gonna need a reliable cow shed and housing for the sheeps  

 
If you look closely at this tiny ad, you will see five bicycles and a naked woman:
Greenhouse of the Future ebook - now free for a while
https://permies.com/goodies/greenhouse
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic