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Fukuoka method for single seeds?

 
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Single seed application seems like it would work so well.

I am thinking about doing it for trees, whichever will work best. I have procured many hedge apple seeds for a hedge row

. Dropping single-seeded clay balls with hedge seems like it would work fine.

But what about vegetables? Flowers? The general rule is to make an amount of seeds in proportion to the clay and compost material, but I have many types of plants, but fewer seeds of each.

I simply don't have the wherewithal to start the plants indoors. Dropping them on the ground with everything they need to start sprouting sounds more appealing to me.

Does anyone have experience with this? Thoughts? Comments?

Thank you.
 
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I think you should try it, and I think that's what Fukuoka taught us: to experiment and see what works. And when something doesn't work, we try something else, and if something unintentional accidentally works, then we start doing that intentionally.

I've made little seed balls by hand and put a few seeds in each, but I guess that's the hard way to make seed balls. But I guess that's what you have to do if you don't have many seeds.

However, if you start planting your vegetables and flowers, then you could start saving their seeds and have many more for next year. It's not that hard to save seeds because instead of putting them in compost buckets, we can put them on towels to dry.
 
Nathaniel Swasey
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https://youtu.be/oi38cQMORQY
About a minute into this video, this lady puts two seeds in clay balls. Later she's able to dig out the sprouts with the balls still intact somewhat with the roots growing out of them.

She's not throwing them on the ground like Fukuoka, but it seems pretty reliable with just two seeds per ball.

Just wondering if anyone has any experience in this before I invest my seeds into an experiment.
 
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