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Mutinus elegans: elegant stinkhorn, dog stinkhorn, headless stinkhorn or the devil's dipstick

 
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Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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This morning I was raking back some mulch in one of the gardens and uncovered what I first thought were small potatoes that we had missed digging until I touched one and then I thought they might be turtle eggs?

It seems they are neither and maybe a fungus?  very soft and when cut open held liquid and such a beautiful color!

There were maybe a dozen or so in one small area, maybe a square foot....

Anyone know what they might be and if they are a good sign? or a danger?


EDIT: size wise they are all an inch to inch and a quarter, some of them were rounder most elongated like those in my photos.

EDIT: ID'd by Jennifer in the post below

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Looks like a stinkhorn fungus of some sort, maybe this fella?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mutinus_elegans



 
Judith Browning
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Jennifer Kowalski wrote:Looks like a stinkhorn fungus of some sort, maybe this fella?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mutinus_elegans





Thank you!
That looks like the one...I'll have read up on it to see if I want to leave it or not?
 
Jennifer Kowalski
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Judith Browning wrote:

Jennifer Kowalski wrote:Looks like a stinkhorn fungus of some sort, maybe this fella?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mutinus_elegans





Thank you!
That looks like the one...I'll have read up on it to see if I want to leave it or not?



From what I’ve read, they’re not gonna be that great as a food source (though the inner bit of an immature “egg” is sometimes foraged from certain stinkhorns,  it seems?), they can smell really unpleasant and attract flies...so if the stinkers bug you (puns fully intended!) you can get rid of them, or just let them do their decompositional thing.

https://hort.extension.wisc.edu/articles/stinkhorns/
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