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Growing the black diamond watermelon

 
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I found some advice for growing the black diamond watermelon, and it advises to water the plant until its fruit gets to be the size of a tennis ball and then only if the plant starts to dry out. (Guide to Growing Black Diamond Watermelon - Heirloom Organics) I could do this, but has anyone grown these or sugar baby watermelons without watering?
 
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Kete Foy wrote:I found some advice for growing the black diamond watermelon, and it advises to water the plant until its fruit gets to be the size of a tennis ball and then only if the plant starts to dry out. (Guide to Growing Black Diamond Watermelon - Heirloom Organics) I could do this, but has anyone grown these or sugar baby watermelons without watering?



Hi Kete,

You can dry farm anything, how well that works depends on what you are growing and where (your location). Melons and other produce that easily splits can be run into issues with rain and heat and inconsistent watering is the main cause of melons splitting. They are just trying to help you grow a few until they hit a perfect ripening so you get to eat them.

In the right climate and soil conditions, you don’t have to do anything, but if your climate and soil conditions are not right, then you have to artificially control that in order to have success. So if your soil naturally stays well hydrated until they reach tennis ball size, and then naturally stays moist and doesn’t dry out, then you are good to go. If not, then you might need to help it with mulch and watering and protecting the melons.

Here is a link that offers a little more as well as some tips.

https://homeguides.sfgate.com/grow-hearts-gold-cantaloupe-27217.html

Good Luck!
 
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https://permies.com/t/155798/Permaculture-Farm-Food-Forest-Rent
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