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Log or bag cultivation? which one of then is better? and why?  RSS feed

 
dan tura
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I'm just wondering what do you think about the questions above.

[I'm thinking about wood rotting fungi]
 
Isaac Hill
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Location: Beaver County, Pennsylvania (~ zone 6)
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That depends on the type of fungi being grown. You can't grow some on logs and you can only grow some on logs. Some can grow on both. One of my friends can't eat oysters grown on logs, but can on different substrate. But, as with everything else in permaculture, it depends.
 
dan tura
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Yes indeed you're right. My question is not clear. When I've posted this question I was thinking about wood rotting fungi. How come that your friend cannot eat oysters grown on logs? what's the difference? are you thinking about their texture and taste?
 
M.K. Dorje
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Location: Orgyen
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To answer your initial question, it really does depend on which species of mushroom you want to grow and usually it also depends on what resources you have for growing them. For example, I've grown reishi mushrooms on hardwood logs, but they can also be grown on blocks/bags of sawdust and wood chips as well. Oysters can easily be grown in bags or logs, but I prefer logs for their long-term harvest potential. Maitake is one I have had no success with on logs, so I would not recommend log culture for that species. I've had success with growing shiitake on hardwood logs and sawdust blocks/bags as well, just depends on the resources that you have available. Oak logs are good for growing shiitake and can fruit for years, so I prefer oak logs. However, commercial shiitake growers in North America prefer sawdust blocks because they have a quick turnaround time. For more info, consult the books by paul stamets.
 
dan tura
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Thank you for your reply, your answer is excellent. Indeed for commercial purposes, bag cultivation is better because it's faster. I have two of his books and I can say that I've learned a lot from him.
 
Isaac Hill
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Location: Beaver County, Pennsylvania (~ zone 6)
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Just came back from my friend's house who commercially grows shitake. He says that while bag is faster, log is higher quality. If you're selling to restaurants, the chefs are going to want the highest quality they can get. They'll pay for it too. In addition, log produces much longer than bag (years).
 
dan tura
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As I think, depends on substrate type used for bag cultivation. Let's say that you have a mix of several ingredients (oak, birch, poplar, supplements) that will provide nutrients for your mushrooms to grow, probably the first flush will provide you quality mushrooms, while growing on wood logs (e.g., oyster), you actually have one type of substrate. His opinion, from a logical point of view is true if you grow oysters on straw without any supplement addition this = with lower quality mushrooms while mushrooms grown on oak logs are higher in quality.
 
dan tura
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I've prepared some of my ideas related to this topic. You are invited to read them here: Bag Or Log Cultivation? Which One Is Better? And Why?

Feel free to comment.
 
David Hartley
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Bags/blocks offer sooner results and year-round growing in a controlled growing habitat. However; the overhead costs, disposable wastes and micro-management are very high (comparatively)... Shiitakes, from petri dish to fruits in five months or less...

Innoculating hardwood logs with wood dowel spawn creates the least waste of almost all cultivation methods. Depending on wood type, diameter and length; they will produce fruitbodies for 5, 10 or even more years... The downside: takes 1~3 years for first fruits and only "in season". Housing within a coldframe of sorts can help expedite colonization to first fruits as well as extend the fruiting season(s)...


My advise for someone wishing to incorporate homegrown mushrooms into their diet now: do both! Either until the logs start producing or simply consider the seasonal log harvests as a "bumper crop" or "rainy day funds"


Be blessed
 
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