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KOMO Grain Mill

 
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What was your inspiration for the grain mill? Gene Short.
 
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I'm interested in this answer as well, along with any insights on design considerations and what makes it different from other models that are out there.
 
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My wife wants a mill to Crack our animal feed for our meat chickens, we feed between 10 and 30 lbs a day (depending on age) to the chickens. Does the speed increase dramatically as you increase the final particle size?

She also wants to grind flour for baking, will this mill do both do you think?
 
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Location: Matlock, Washington
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I am wanting to move to using fresh ground flours for my breads and have been looking at the different grinders.  I want to use soft and hard grains and ancient grains.   I also need to be able to make flour for pastry making.

What advice can you give me?
Thanks.
 
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Location: Canada's West Coast
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I've been researching  grain mills to grind whole wheat and rye for sourdough bread making. Would the Komo classic be a good choice for this?
And critically how noisy is this mill? What kind of sound level (in dB) is it? Sorry but  I'm an electrical engineering guy so dB levels make sense to me.
The other mills I've researched are all very loud and in the interest of not annoying my wife with my cooking pursuits this is kinda important. Happy wife, happy Life!
 
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Hi Ginny!

Welcome to Permies!

How difficult is the gran mill to use? I have a  health issue that can  sometimes limit  me when using anything that hand cranks; but I  persevere and usually  get the job done; it just might take me a bit longer.
 
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Growing up, my parents had a stone grinder with a wood body like the KOMO Grain Mill, and barrels and barrels of whole wheat berries. We had a large family to provide for. I remember the smell of sifting my clean hands through the mountains of fresh berries ready for grinding. My parents taught me when I was eight how to use this magnificent and frightful machine. On Saturday I would grind the wheat and make bread dough, kneading the stretchy dough, rising and forming it into several loaves. We left the loaves in the pans to rise overnight in the oven with the pilot light. Just before leaving for church, we would turn the oven on low. When we got home the house was filled with the aroma of fresh bread and we all stood around in the kitchen together cutting thick steaming slices of the dense bread and slathering it with butter, and molasses or raw honey. It was a complete meal, as far as we we're concerned, full of protein and vitamins and happy little faces. This is, hands down, one of my most favorite childhood memories. I would love to make that bread again for my son and I am excited to learn the other things this machine can grind up for more good old fashioned farm style recipes! This one looks like a winner!
Polish_20211214_152910079.png
A distant sweet memory
A distant sweet memory
 
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Location: Iowa USA
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I'm new to grinding wheat berries and other things so definitely have a lot to learn but would like to use what works
best even if a bit of work involved.
 
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Location: west coast of Wisconsin
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The Komo mill looks beautiful. I used to make sourdough bread, pancakes, Sourdough Sam's, etc. Would be great to grow and mill my own grain and experiment.
 
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