• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • raven ranson
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Julia Winter
garden masters:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • thomas rubino
  • Bill Crim
  • Kim Goodwin
  • Joylynn Hardesty
gardeners:
  • Amit Enventres
  • Mike Jay
  • Dan Boone

Lowering pH with peat moss  RSS feed

 
Posts: 63
Location: Greater New Orleans, LA, USA
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I would like to grow strawberries, blueberries, camellia(Camellia sinensis) and a couple goumi(Elaeagnus multiflora) bushes in the same garden bed. They are all acid-loving plants, luckily.

Could anyone tell me what peat:compost ratio I would need to get to a pH of 5.5 for a raised bed? This would be assuming a compost pH of about 7(Black Kow composted manure and Black Velvet mushroom compost).

I use SFG for my annuals, and that pH is ~6.5. It's 1/3 peat moss(pH of 3). But since pH is a logarithmic scale, I'm unsure of the actual formula to lower it further.
 
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
89
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

I don't know anything about using peat moss, sustainable sources or not: (I've seen the PRI thread), but your general soil is around ph 6.5, right?
In my experience all the plants you mention except blueberries will grow ok in that ph.
My ph is 6.8 and blueberries would be miserable here!
 
Allan Babb
Posts: 63
Location: Greater New Orleans, LA, USA
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes, it is mostly for the blueberries. I've tried sulfur and pine bark/needles, but my "soil" seems to leach everything too quickly. I guess it's off to experiment for myself.
 
Posts: 361
Location: Portlandia, Oregon
7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
In my experience, blueberries forgive a slightly less than perfect ph, if you give them lots of yummy organic matter. On a side note, I mulch mine with pine needles.
 
I agree. Here's the link: https://richsoil.com/wood-heat.jsp
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!